< Events that happened in #onthisday #otd #history #twitterstorians #dh
Historical events when someone or something
said
.
Sorted by importance.

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to
in 1962

" her only defect is that she is 27 years old. In all other respects she is splendid: clever, cheerful, straightforward and very likeable."


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" I'll never believe that a man who understood nothing could feel the Fifth Symphony. Of course they understood, they understood what was happening around them and they understood what the Fifth was about"


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in 1852

" Gogol is dead!... What Russian heart is not shaken by those three words?... He is gone, that man whom we now have the right (the bitter right, given to us by death) to call great."


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in 1926

" So we should all attempt to acquire as much knowledge as possible, in order that we may render our services to society in the manner of the women of early Islam."


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in 1926

" It (Independence) belongs to all of us and that is why we celebrate it. Do you think, however, that our nation from the outset needs only men to serve it? Women should also take their part as women did in the early years of our nation and Islam. From their examples we must learn that we must all contribute toward the development of our nation and that this cannot be done without being equipped with knowledge."


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in 1750

" What a terrible man he was. But he was just, intelligent, and skilled in the management of affairs... it was through his efforts, through his tireless labor, that I have been able to accomplish everything that I have done since"


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" I love the man, and that’s it."

told reporters


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" Коли влада вживає надмірну силу, народ має право збройно боронитися. Кожен із нас має право боронитися. Україна стоїть на порозі дуже серйозних змін на краще. Періоди занепаду ще будуть, але має статися щось зовсім надзвичайне, аби ми скотилися на саме дно"

заявив він в інтерв’ю газеті “Україна Молода”


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in 1833

" Hermann went out of his mind, and is now confined in room Number 17 of the Obukhov Hospital. He never answers any questions, but he constantly mutters with unusual rapidity: "Three, seven, ace!" "Three, seven, queen!""

The Queen of Spades


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in 1833

" "Ace has won!" cried Hermann, showing his card. "Your queen has lost," said Chekalinsky, politely. Hermann started; instead of an ace, there lay before him the queen of spades! He could not believe his eyes, nor could he understand how he had made such a mistake. At that moment it seemed to him that the queen of spades smiled ironically and winked her eye at him. He was struck by her remarkable resemblance... "The old Countess!" he exclaimed, seized with terror."


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in 1833

" Two fixed ideas can no more exist together in the moral world than two bodies can occupy one and the same place in the physical world."


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in 1833

" "I have come to you against my wish," she said in a firm voice: "but I have been ordered to grant your request. Three, seven, ace, will win for you if played in succession, but only on these conditions: that you do not play more than one card in twenty-four hours, and that you never play again during the rest of your life. I forgive you my death, on condition that you marry my companion, Lizaveta Ivanovna.""


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in 1833

" "The bread of the stranger is bitter," says Dante, "and his staircase hard to climb." But who can know what the bitterness of dependence is so well as the poor companion of an old lady of quality?"


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in 1825

" Ah! heavy art thou, crown of Monomakh!"


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in 1825

" Like some magistrate grown gray in office, Calmly he contemplates alike the just And unjust, with indifference he notes Evil and good, and knows not wrath nor pity."


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in 1825

" Pimen [writing in front of a sacred lamp]: One more, the final record, and my annals Are ended, and fulfilled the duty laid By God on me a sinner. Not in vain Hath God appointed me for many years A witness, teaching me the art of letters; A day will come when some laborious monk Will bring to light my zealous, nameless toil, Kindle, as I, his lamp, and from the parchment Shaking the dust of ages will transcribe My true narrations."


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in 1823

" Always contented with his life, and with his dinner, and his wife."


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in 1823

" Unforced, as conversation passed, he had the talent of saluting felicitously every theme, of listening like a judge-supreme while serious topics were disputing, or, with an epigram-surprise, of kindling smiles in ladies' eyes."


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in 1823

" There yet remains but one concluding tale, And then this chronicle of mine is ended— Fulfilled, the duty God ordained to me, A sinner. Not without purpose did the Lord Put me to witness much for many years And educate me in the love of books. One day some indefatigable monk Will find my conscientious, unsigned work; Like me, he will light up his ikon-lamp And, shaking from the scroll the age-old dust, He will transcribe these tales in all their truth."

Prologue, sec. 5, l. 18-28.


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to
in 1823

" But, as it is, this pied collection begs your indulgence — it's been spun from threads both sad and humoristic, themes popular or idealistic, products of carefree hours, of fun, of sleeplessness, faint inspirations, of powers unripe, or on the wane, of reason's icy intimations, and records of a heart in pain."


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" God grant you, friends, a helping hand— In cares of state and private plights, In rowdy feasts of friendship's band, In passion's sweet and secret rites! God grant you, friends, a helping hand— In daily woes and days of strife, On vacant sa, in distant land, In every black abyss of life!"

as quoted in Pushkin, Alexander (2009). Selected Lyric Poetry. Northwestern University Press, p. 121.


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in 1834

" Tis time, my friend, tis time! For rest the heart is aching; Days follow days in flight, and every day is taking Fragments of being, while together you and I Make plans to live. Look, all is dust, and we shall die."

Tis Time, My Friend, l. 1-5


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in 1833

" And thus He mused: "From here, indeed Shall we strike terror in the Swede? And here a city by our labor Founded, shall gall our haughty neighbor; "Here cut" - so Nature gives command - Your window through on Europe; stand Firm-footed by the sea, unchanging!"

from The Bronze Horseman


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in 1883

" Upon the brink of the wild stream He stood, and dreamt a mighty dream."

The Bronze Horseman. trans. Charles Johnston.


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to
in 1863

" Yes, Mussorgsky is little short of an idiot."

Balakirev agreed with Stasov


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to
in 1863

" I have no use for Mussorgsky. His views may tally with mine, but I have never heard him express an intelligent idea. All in him is flabby, dull. He is, it seems to me, a thorough idiot."

in a letter


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to
in 1870

" [T]he Mighty Handful has degenerated into soulless traitors."


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to
in 1858

" Because I am not a theorist, I could not teach him harmony (as, for instance Rimsky-Korsakov now teaches it) ... [but] I explained to him the form of compositions, and to do this we played through both Beethoven symphonies [as piano duets] and much else (Schumann, Schubert, Glinka, and others), analyzing the form"


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to
in 1856

" His politeness and good manners were exceptional. The ladies made a fuss of him. He sat at the piano and, throwing up his hands coquettishly, played with extreme sweetness and grace (etc) extracts from Trovatore, Traviata, and so on, and around him buzzed in chorus: "Charmant, délicieux!" and suchlike. I met Modest Petrovich three or four times at Popov's in this way, both on duty and at the hospital."["


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to
in 1856

" His little uniform was spic and span, close-fitting, his feet turned outwards, his hair smoothed down and greased, his nails perfectly cut, his hands well groomed like a lord's. His manners were elegant, aristocratic: his speech likewise, delivered through somewhat clenched teeth, interspersed with French phrases, rather precious. There was a touch—though very moderate—of foppishness."


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in 1916

" history is a graveyard of aristocracies"


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to

" Alas! turning an envious eye towards the past, inconsolable by anything on earth, I keep looking at that moment of my life when I saw her open her wings and fly away! I will see that instant until I die, that instant—too much for tears! when I cried out: "The child that I had just now— what! I don't have her any more!""

He describes his shock and grief of the death of his oldest daugter


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" All changes in nature are such that inasmuch is taken from one object insomuch is added to another. So, if the amount of matter decreases in one place, it increases elsewhere. This universal law of nature embraces laws of motion as well, for an object moving others by its own force in fact imparts to another object the force it loses"


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to
in 1741

" An element is a part of a body that does not consist of any other smaller and different bodies ... corpuscle is a collection of elements forming one small mass."


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in 1756

" Today I made an experiment in hermetic glass vessels in order to determine whether the mass of metals increases from the action of pure heat. The experiments– of which I append the record in 13 pages– demonstrated that the famous Robert Boyle was deluded, for without access of air from outside the mass of the burnt metal remains the same"

after trying to replicate Robert Boyle's experiment of 1673


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to
in 1832

" To praise it would amount to praising myself. For the entire content of the work ... coincides almost exactly with my own meditations which have occupied my mind for the past thirty or thirty-five years."


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in 1801

" regular heptadecagon (17-sided polygon) can be constructed with straightedge and compass"


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" ΕΥΡΗΚΑ! num = Δ + Δ’ + Δ"


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to

" Born in Catanzaro(1962-Italy) where he lives and works…Claudio Parentela is an illustrator,painter,photographer,mail artist,cartoonist,collagist,journalist free lance...Active since many years in the international contemporary art scene.He has collaborated&he collaborates with many,many zines,magazines of contemporary art,literary and of comics in Italy and in the world...& on the paper and on the web...some name amongst the many:NYArtsMagazine,Turntable & Blue Light Magazine, Komix,LitChaos,"


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to

" My beloved Elsa! Your cruel father has torn us apart. Eternally yours, Heinrich."


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to

" The main substance of our relationship has always been … Richard Wagner's remarkable and deeply moving destiny"


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to

" And to sleep, and sleep, and sleep— And to fall asleep forever, And to leave no trace At all, as if it were all the same Whether you had lived or died! Fate, where are you, fate where are you? I have none! If you begrudge me a good one, Lord, Then give me a bad one! A bad one!"


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to

" My fate, fate, where are you now? I have none; If you begrudge me a good one, Lord, Then give me a bad one! Let a walking man not sleep, To die in spirit And knock about the entire world Like a rotten stump. But let me live, with my heart live And love people. And if not… then curse And burn the world! It’s horrible to end up in chains To die in captivity, But it’s worse to be free"


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to

" The days pass, the nights pass, As does summer. Yellowed leaves Rustle, eyes grow dim, Thoughts fall asleep, the heart sleeps, All has gone to rest, and I don’t know Whether I’m alive or will live, Or whether I’m rushing like this through the world, For I’m no longer weeping or laughing…"


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in 1957

" If you say why not bomb them tomorrow, I say why not today? If you say today at five o' clock, I say why not one o' clock?"

As quoted in "The Passing of a Great Mind" by Clay Blair, Jr., in LIFE Magazine


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in 1955

" It is just as foolish to complain that people are selfish and treacherous as it is to complain that the magnetic field does not increase unless the electric field has a curl. Both are laws of nature."


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in 1955

" When we talk mathematics, we may be discussing a secondary language built on the primary language of the nervous system."

As quoted in John von Neumann


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in 1956

" It is exceptional that one should be able to acquire the understanding of a process without having previously acquired a deep familiarity with running it, with using it, before one has assimilated it in an instinctive and empirical way… Thus any discussion of the nature of intellectual effort in any field is difficult, unless it presupposes an easy, routine familiarity with that field. In mathematics this limitation becomes very severe."

As quoted in "The Mathematician" in The World of Mathematics


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in 1955

" The sciences do not try to explain, they hardly even try to interpret, they mainly make models. By a model is meant a mathematical construct which, with the addition of certain verbal interpretations, describes observed phenomena. The justification of such a mathematical construct is solely and precisely that it is expected to work."

"Method in the Physical Sciences", in The Unity of Knowledge (1955), ed. L. G. Leary (Doubleday & Co., New York), p. 157


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in 1954

" By and large it is uniformly true in mathematics that there is a time lapse between a mathematical discovery and the moment when it is useful; and that this lapse of time can be anything from 30 to 100 years, in some cases even more; and that the whole system seems to function without any direction, without any reference to usefulness, and without any desire to do things which are useful."

"The Role of Mathematics in the Sciences and in Society" (1954) an address to Princeton alumni


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in 1954

" A large part of mathematics which becomes useful developed with absolutely no desire to be useful, and in a situation where nobody could possibly know in what area it would become useful; and there were no general indications that it ever would be so."

The Role of Mathematics in the Sciences and in Society an address to Princeton alumni


(
39.283,-76.616
)

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in 1951

" Any one who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits is, of course, in a state of sin. For, as has been pointed out several times, there is no such thing as a random number — there are only methods to produce random numbers, and a strict arithmetic procedure of course is not such a method."

in Monte Carlo Method (1951) edited by A.S. Householder, G.E. Forsythe, and H.H. Germond


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in 1947

" But, once they are conceived, the subject begins to live a peculiar life of its own and is … governed by almost entirely aesthetical motivations. In other words, at a great distance from its empirical source, or after much "abstract" inbreeding, a mathematical subject is in danger of degeneration. Whenever this stage is reached the only remedy seems to me to be the rejuvenating return to the source: the reinjection of more or less directly empirical ideas."

"The Mathematician", in The Works of the Mind (1947) edited by R. B. Heywood, University of Chicago Press, Chicago


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in 1947

" I think that it is a relatively good approximation to truth — which is much too complicated to allow anything but approximations — that mathematical ideas originate in empirics."

"The Mathematician", in The Works of the Mind (1947) edited by R. B. Heywood, University of Chicago Press, Chicago


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" I am very sorry to know and hear how irreverently that precious jewel, the Word of God, is disputed, rimed, sung, and jangled in every alehouse and tavern, contrary to the true meaning and doctrine of the same."

English Church History from the Death of King Henry VII to the Death of Archbishop Parker, Rev. Alfred Plummer, 1905, Edinburg, T. & T. Clark, p. 85


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" Be not judges yourselves of your own fantastical opinions and vain expositions; and although you be permitted to read Holy Scriptures and to have the Word of God in your mother tongue, you must understand it is licensed so to do only to inform your conscience and inform your children and families, not to make Scripture a railing and taunting stock against priests and preachers."


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" Alas, how can the poor souls live in concord when you preachers sow amongst them in your sermons debate and discord? They look to you for light and you bring them darkness. Amend these crimes, I exhort you, and set forth God's word truly, both by true preaching and giving a good example, or else, I, whom God has appointed his vicar and high minister here, will see these divisions extinct, and these enormities corrected..."

Last speech to parliament


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" We be informed by our judges that we at no time stand so highly in our estate royal as in the time of Parliament, wherein we as head and you as members are conjoined and knit together into one body politic, so as whatsoever offence or injury (during that time) is offered to the meanest member of the House is to be judged as done against our person and the whole Court of Parliament."

Speech to Parliament on parliamentary privilege (March/April 1542), as quoted in Holinshed's Chronicles of England, Scotland, and Ireland Volume III (1808), by Raphael Holinshed, p. 824.


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" Well beloved subjects, wee thought that the clergie of our realme had been our subjectes wholy, but now we have well perceived that they bee but halfe our subjectes, yea, and scarce our subjectes: for all the prelates at their consecration make an othe to the pope, clene contrary to the the that they make to us, so that they seme to be his subjectes, and not ours."

Speech to Parliament (11 May, 1532), as quoted in Hall's Chronicle (1809), edited by Sir Henry Ellis, p. 788


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" for otherwise there would be no interference with a tribune even though he should try to demolish the Capitol or set fire to the naval arsenal. If a tribune does these things, he is a bad tribune; but if he annuls the power of the people, he is no tribune at all... And surely, if it is right for him to be made tribune by a majority of the votes of the tribes, it must be even more right for him to be deprived of his tribuneship by a unanimous vote."


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" sacred and inviolable, because he was consecrated to the people and was a champion of the people... If, then he should change about, wrong the people, maim its power, and rob it of the privilege of voting, he has by his own acts deprived himself of his honourable office by not fulfilling the conditions on which he received it; "

Tiberius justified the expulsion of Octavius by stating that a tribune was


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in -133

" The wild beasts that roam over Italy have their dens, each has a place of repose and refuge. But the men who fight and die for Italy enjoy nothing but the air and light; without house or home they wander about with their wives and children."

Speaking before a crowd at the Rostra


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to
in 62

" showed neither discrimination nor moderation in putting to death whomsoever he pleased"


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" Qualis artifex pereo. (Translation: What an artist dies in me!)"


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" Vellem nescire literas."


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in 1854

" Securely packs the most fragile objects. Specializing in packing fashions."

Outside the shop a sign hung reading


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in 1866

" Resisting the slow touch of a frozen finger tracing out my spine."


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" How much longer are we English to assist foreign nations in misunderstand us, by holding up that ridiculous lay-figure of our race known by the style and title of John Bull?"

"One Grand Tour Deserves Another" in All the Year Round: A Weekly Journal


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in 1859

" I have known a vast quantity of nonsense talked about bad men not looking you in the face. Don't trust that conventional idea. Dishonesty will stare honesty out of countenance, any day in the week, if there is anything to be got by it."


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to

" It was a good thing to have a couple of thousand people all rigid and frozen together, in the palm of one's hand."

About having a book


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to

" La difficulté d'écrire l'anglais m'est extrêmement ennuyeuse. Ah, mon Dieu ! si l'on pouvait toujours écrire cette belle langue de France! (The difficulty of writing English is most tiresome to me. My God! If only we could write this beautiful language of France at all times!)"


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in 1844

" O let us love our occupations, Bless the squire and his relations, Live upon our daily rations, And always know our proper stations."

The Chimes, Second Quarter


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" I am quite serious when I say that I do not believe there are, on the whole earth besides, so many intensified bores as in these United States. No man can form an adequate idea of the real meaning of the word, without coming here."

Comment while on an American tour (March 1842), as quoted in Dickens (1949) by Hesketh Pearson, Ch. 8


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in 1842

" They who strew the Eternal Path with the greatest amount of brimstone, and who most ruthlessly tread down the flowers and leaves that grow by the wayside, will be voted the most righteous; and they who enlarge with the greatest pertinacity on the difficulty of getting into heaven will be considered, by all true believers, certain of going there: though it would be hard to say by what process of reasoning this conclusion is arrived at."


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in 1842

" Wherever religion is resorted to as a strong drink, and as an escape from the dull, monotonous round of home, those of its ministers who pepper the highest will be the surest to please. "


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in 1841

" The bright old day now dawns again; the cry runs through the the land, In England there shall be dear bread—in Ireland, sword and brand; And poverty, and ignorance, shall swell the rich and grand, So, rally round the rulers with the gentle iron hand, Of the fine old English Tory days; Hail to the coming time!"

The Fine Old English Gentleman


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in 1840

" To conceal anything from those to whom I am attached, is not in my nature. I can never close my lips where I have opened my heart."

Master Humphrey's Clock, (1840) Vol. 1


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to

" If any one were to ask me what in my opinion was the dullest and most stupid spot on the face of the Earth, I should decidedly say Chelmsford."

in Madeline House, et al., The Letters of Charles Dickens


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in 1833

" There were two classes of created objects which he held in the deepest and most unmingled horror: they were, dogs and children. He was not unamiable, but he could at any time have viewed the execution of a dog, or the assassination of an infant, with the liveliest satisfaction. Their habits were at variance with his love of order; and his love of order, was as powerful as his love of life."

"A Dinner at Poplar Walk" (1833), later published as "Mr. Minns and his Cousin"


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in 1833

" Mr. Augustus Minns was a bachelor, of about forty as he said — of about eight-and-forty as his friends said. He was always exceedingly clean, precise, and tidy: perhaps somewhat priggish, and the most retiring man in the world."

First lines of Dicken's first published work, originally titled "A Dinner at Poplar Walk" (1833), later published as "Mr. Minns and his Cousin"


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to
in 1901

" "Just as only a lover can reveal to a man what life means to him and develop its innermost significance, I feel the same about these paintings."

wrote, in his Speech on Klimt:


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in 1937

" The ability to deal with people is as purchasable a commodity as sugar or coffee, and I will pay more for that ability than for any other under the sun."

Attributed in How to Win Friends and Influence People


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750325

in 1932

" I believe the power to make money is a gift of God … to be developed and used to the best of our ability for the good of mankind. Having been endowed with the gift I possess, I believe it is my duty to make money and still more money and to use the money I make for the good of my fellow man according to the dictates of my conscience."

Interview with William Hoster, quoted in God's Gold


750324
0
1
750324
750324
0
750324


" I believe it is a religious duty to get all the money you can, fairly and honestly; to keep all you can, and to give away all you can."

TIME Magazine


750323
0
1
750323
750323
0
750323


" I was early taught to work as well as play, My life has been one long, happy holiday; Full of work and full of play — I dropped the worry on the way — And God was good to me every day."

Verses written on his eighty-sixth birthday


750322
0
1
750322
750322
0
750322

in 1918

" The most important thing for a young man is to establish a credit — a reputation, character."

The Men Who Are Making America (1918) by Bertie Charles Forbes


750321
0
1
750321
750321
0
750321

in 1915

" God gave me my money."

Women's Home Companion (1915), quoted in God's Gold (1932) by John T. Flynn


750320
0
1
750320
750320
0
750320


" It is wrong to assume that men of immense wealth are always happy."

Attributed as a statement to his Bible class (1 April 1905) in "The Loneliness of John D. Rockefeller", Current Literature (November 1906) vol. 41 no. 5,


750319
0
1
750319
750319
0
750319

in 1901

" The impression was gaining ground with me that it was a good thing to let the money be my slave and not make myself a slave to money."

As quoted in How They Succeeded (1901) by Orison Swett Marden


750318
0
1
750318
750318
0
750318


" The impression was gaining ground with me that it was a good thing to let the money be my slave and not make myself a slave to money."


750317
0
1
750317
750317
0
750317


" "The power of the Executive to cast a man into prison without formulating any charge known to the law, and particularly to deny him the judgment of his peers, is in the highest degree odious and is the foundation of all totalitarian government whether Nazi or Communist" "


749319
0
1
749319
749319
0
749319


" Whatever shall we do in that remote spot? Well, we will write our memoirs. Work is the scythe of time."


749259
0
1
749259
749259
0
749259

in 2006

" Cheney’s a good man. He’s got a good heart. [Pause] Well, he’s a good man."


747871
0
1
747871
747871
0
747871

in 2000

" Over the last few months I’ve lost 10 pounds. Where did they go? Why haven’t I produced them to the independent counsel? How did some of them manage to wind up on Tim Russert?"

at the 2000 White House correspondents’ dinner


747870
0
1
747870
747870
0
747870

in 1989

" People say I’m indecisive, but I don’t know about that."

at the 1989 Gridiron Club dinner


747869
0
1
747869
747869
0
747869

in 1979

" Press Secretary Jody Powell “has been trying to persuade me to reopen the White House swimming pool — suddenly. . . Any of you that survive would, of course, have permanent swimming privileges."

riffing at the correspondents’ dinner about the old White House indoor swimming pool that Richard Nixon covered over to build the press room


747867
0
1
747867
747867
0
747867

in 1974

" At a time when funds for the defense budget may be cut, it’s comforting to see so many of the big guns from your industry still getting loaded."

at a boozy Radio and Television Correspondents’ Association dinner


747866
0
1
747866
747866
0
747866

in 1971

" Let me make one thing perfectly clear. I wouldn’t want to wake up next to a lady pipefitter."

in Ms. magazine when asked about women’s lib


747865
0
1
747865
747865
0
747865

in 1961

" I don’t see anything wrong with giving Bobby a little legal experience before he goes out on his own to practice law."

responding to criticism that Robert Kennedy wasn’t qualified to be attorney general


747864
0
1
747864
747864
0
747864

in 1915

" Jerry — you recall Jerry, whose cards I once sent you to Europe — came in while I was pondering your notes in glad reflection, and we talked about it."

referring to his penis, which he named Jerry, in a 1915 love letter to his mistress Carrie Fulton Phillips


747861
0
1
747861
747861
0
747861

in 1884

" Ma, Ma, where’s my Pa? Gone to the White House. Ha ha ha!"

who had two separate administrations but just not enough good quips to fill them both, so we turn to a joke told not by but about Cleveland during the 1884 race, concerning rumors that he had fathered a child out of wedlock


747860
0
1
747860
747860
0
747860

in 1825

" A barbarian who cannot write a sentence of grammar and can hardly spell his own name."


747859
0
1
747859
747859
0
747859


" I always talk better lying down."


747857
0
1
747857
747857
0
747857

to
in 1803

" He[John Adams] is as disinterested as the being who made him."


747856
0
1
747856
747856
0
747856

to
in 1785

" That bastard brat of a Scottish peddler!"


747855
0
1
747855
747855
0
747855

in 1788

" Now you are well served for coming to fight in favour of the American Rebels, all the way across the Atlantic Ocean, by catching that terrible Contagion — domestic felicity — which like the small pox or the plague, a man can have only once in his life: because it commonly lasts him (at least with us in America — I don’t know how you manage these matters in France) for his whole life time."

letter congratulating the Marquis de Chastellux on his recent marriage


747854
0
1
747854
747854
0
747854

in 2012

" I have a lot more material prepared, but I have to get the Secret Service home in time for their new curfew."


(
38.897639,-77.036567
)

747853
0
1
747853
747853
0
747853

in 1993

" I can sing as well as Fred Astaire can act."

Attributed to Reynolds in: Colin Jarman (1993). The Book of Poisonous Quotes. p. 129


747642
0
1
747642
747642
0
747642


" You can only hold your stomach in for so many years."

Attributed to Reynolds in: Orange Coast Magazine, Oct. 1984. p. 143


747641
1
2
747641
747641
0
747641

in 1972

" My movies were the kind they show in prisons and airplanes, because nobody can leave."

In: Briton Hadden, ‎Henry Robinson Luce (1972). Time, Vol. 100. p. 43


747640
0
1
747640
747640
0
747640

to

" Eventually, I think Chicago will be the most beautiful great city left in the world."


747564
1
1
747564
747564
0
747564

to

" To me his (Edgar Allan Poe's) prose is unreadable — like Jane Austen. No there is a difference. I could read his prose on salary, but not Jane's. Jane is entirely impossible. It seems a great pity that they allowed her to die a natural death."


747126
0
1
747126
747126
0
747126

to
in 1920

" There is an infinite amount of hope in the universe ... but not for us."


745883
0
2
745883
745883
0
745883

to

" Why, this is violence! (Ista quidem vis est!)"


745795
0
1
745795
745795
0
745795


" And while my illness was at its worst, I still painted, among other things a reminiscence of Brabant, cottages with mossy roofs and beech hedges on an autumn evening with a stormy sky, the sun setting red in reddish clouds."


745603
0
1
745603
745603
0
745603


" What, Sir, would the people of the earth be without woman? They would be scarce, sir, almighty scarce."


745540
0
1
745540
745540
0
745540


" To hell with the government...You New Dealer!"


745070
0
1
745070
745070
0
745070

in 1933

" Everyone wants to be Cary Grant. Even I want to be Cary Grant."


745051
1
1
745051
745051
0
745051

to

" This time it's simply my bedroom, but the color will have to do the job here"


744990
0
1
744990
744990
0
744990

in 1963

" Dont try to hide your arousal, honey. It's not possible."


744645
1
2
744645
744645
1
744645

in 2015

" When we play soccer its art."


744544
0
1
744544
744544
0
744544


" I can drink 20 drinks, its fucking scary."


(
41.883,-87.633
)

744543
0
1
744543
744543
0
744543

to
in 2006

" Dont complain without offering a solution."


(
41.883,-87.633
)

744542
0
1
744542
744542
0
744542


" he was my dad of patrick"


(
38.897639,-77.036567
)

744089
1
1
744089
744089
19
744089

in 1883

" From the moment I crossed the threshold of the Olmutz theatre I felt like one awaiting the wrath of God."


743650
0
2
743650
743650
0
743650

in 1880

" It is not as a child that I believe and confess Jesus Christ. My hosanna is born of a furnace of doubt."


742491
0
2
742491
742491
0
742491

in 1862

" The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons."

The House of the Dead (1862) as translated by Constance Garnett; as cited in The Yale Book of Quotations (2006) by Fred R. Shapiro, p. 210


742490
0
1
742490
742490
0
742490

in 1876

" Neither a person nor a nation can exist without some higher idea. And there is only one higher idea on earth, and it is the idea of the immortality of the human soul, for all other higher ideas of life by which humans might live derive from that idea alone"

A Writer's Diary, Volume 1: 1873-1876 (1994), p. 734


742489
0
1
742489
742489
0
742489

in 1954

" If anyone could prove to me that Christ is outside the truth, and if the truth really did exclude Christ, I should prefer to stay with Christ and not with truth."

Letter To Mme. N. D. Fonvisin (1854), as published in Letters of Fyodor Michailovitch Dostoevsky to his Family and Friends (1914), translated by Ethel Golburn Mayne, Letter XXI, p. 71


742488
0
2
742488
742488
1
742488

in 1939

" To study the meaning of man and of life — I am making significant progress here. I have faith in myself. Man is a mystery: if you spend your entire life trying to puzzle it out, then do not say that you have wasted your time. I occupy myself with this mystery, because I want to be a man."


742487
0
1
742487
742487
1
742487

to

" I think we ought to read only the kind of books that wound and stab us. If the book we are reading doesnt wake us up with a blow on the head, what are we reading it for? ...we need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply, like the death of someone we loved more than ourselves, like being banished into forests far from everyone, like a suicide. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside us"


(
42.1497,-74.9384
)

740503
1
1
740503
740503
0
740503

in 1951

" They said, You’re going to make a lot of mistakes. And I told them, You don’t understand; I want to be free to do so."


740473
0
1
740473
740473
0
740473


" Could I share a personal thought with you tonight, because tonight's kind of special to me. It's the last time, of course, that I will address you under these same circumstances. I hope you'll invite me back to future conventions. Nancy and I will be forever grateful for the honor you've done us, for the opportunity to serve, and for your friendship and trust"


738125
4
1
738125
738125
0
738125

in 1906

" Just knock the balls around a little so that I can get your gait, I will be perfectly fair with you. Ill play you left-handed. I felt hurt, for he was cross-eyed, freckled, and had red hair, and I determined to teach him a lesson. He won first shot, ran out, took my half-dollar, and all I got was the opportunity to chalk my cue."


738062
1
1
738062
738062
0
738062

in 1906

" The game of billiards has destroyed my naturally sweet disposition. Once, when I was an underpaid reporter in Virginia City, whenever I wished to play billiards I went out to look for an easy mark. One day a stranger came to town and opened a billiard parlor. I looked him over casually. When he proposed a game, I answered, All right."


738061
1
1
738061
738061
0
738061


" The vote is the most powerful instrument ever devised by man for breaking down injustice and destroying the terrible walls which imprison men because they are different from other men."


737301
2
1
737301
737301
0
737301

in 1934

" The scientists from Franklin to Morse were clear thinkers and did not produce erroneous theories. The scientists of today think deeply instead of clearly. One must be sane to think clearly, but one can think deeply and be quite insane."


736468
1
1
736468
736468
0
736468

in 1934

" Today's scientists have substituted mathematics for experiments, and they wander off through equation after equation, and eventually build a structure which has no relation to reality."


736467
1
1
736467
736467
0
736467


" But the female mind has demonstrated a capacity for all the mental acquirements and achievements of men, and as generations ensue that capacity will be expanded; the average woman will be as well educated as the average man, and then better educated, for the dormant faculties of her brain will be stimulated to an activity that will be all the more intense and powerful because of centuries of repose. Woman will ignore precedent and startle civilization with their progress."


736466
1
1
736466
736466
0
736466


" Not only this, but through television and telephony we shall see and hear one another as perfectly as though we were face to face, despite intervening distances of thousands of miles; and the instruments through which we shall be able to do his will be amazingly simple compared with our present telephone. A man will be able to carry one in his vest pocket."


736465
1
1
736465
736465
0
736465


" When wireless is perfectly applied the whole earth will be converted into a huge brain, which in fact it is, all things being particles of a real and rhythmic whole. We shall be able to communicate with one another instantly, irrespective of distance. "


736464
2
2
736464
736464
0
736464


" The scientific man does not aim at an immediate result. He does not expect that his advanced ideas will be readily taken up. His work is like that of the planter — for the future. His duty is to lay the foundation for those who are to come, and point the way. He lives and labors and hopes."


736463
1
1
736463
736463
0
736463


" I hold that space cannot be curved, for the simple reason that it can have no properties. It might as well be said that God has properties. He has not, but only attributes and these are of our own making. Of properties we can only speak when dealing with matter filling the space. To say that in the presence of large bodies space becomes curved is equivalent to stating that something can act upon nothing. I, for one, refuse to subscribe to such a view."


736462
1
1
736462
736462
0
736462


" If Edison had a needle to find in a haystack, he would proceed at once with the diligence of the bee to examine straw after straw until he found the object of his search. … I was a sorry witness of such doings, knowing that a little theory and calculation would have saved him ninety per cent of his labor."


736461
1
1
736461
736461
0
736461


" I have harnessed the cosmic rays and caused them to operate a motive device."


736460
3
2
736460
736460
1
736460


" Let the future tell the truth and evaluate each one according to his work and accomplishments. The present is theirs; the future, for which I really worked, is mine."


736459
1
1
736459
736459
0
736459


" Money does not represent such a value as men have placed upon it. All my money has been invested into experiments with which I have made new discoveries enabling mankind to have a little easier life."


736458
1
1
736458
736458
0
736458

in 1908

" As soon as it is completed, it will be possible for a business man in New York to dictate instructions, and have them instantly appear in type at his office in London or elsewhere. "


736457
1
2
736457
736457
0
736457


" ...humanity will be like an ant heap stirred up with a stick: See the excitement coming!"


736456
1
1
736456
736456
0
736456


" when the first plant is inaugurated and it is shown that a telegraphic message, almost as secret and non-interferable as a thought, can be transmitted to any terrestrial distance, the sound of the human voice, with all its intonations and inflections, faithfully and instantly reproduced at any other point of the globe, the energy of a waterfall made available for supplying light, heat or motive power, anywhere — on sea, or land, or high in the air —"


736455
1
2
736455
736455
0
736455


" When the great truth accidentally revealed and experimentally confirmed is fully recognized, that this planet, with all its appalling immensity, is to electric currents virtually no more than a small metal ball and that by this fact many possibilities, each baffling imagination and of incalculable consequence, are rendered absolutely sure of accomplishment;"


736454
1
1
736454
736454
0
736454


" Our virtues and our failings are inseparable, like force and matter. When they separate, man is no more."


736453
1
1
736453
736453
0
736453


" A single ray of light from a distant star falling upon the eye of a tyrant in bygone times may have altered the course of his life, may have changed the destiny of nations, may have transformed the surface of the globe, so intricate, so inconceivably complex are the processes in Nature. "


(
39.95,-75.16666667
)

736452
1
1
736452
736452
0
736452


" Nature may reach the same result in many ways. Like a wave in the physical world, in the infinite ocean of the medium which pervades all, so in the world of organisms, in life, an impulse started proceeds onward, at times, may be, with the speed of light, at times, again, so slowly that for ages and ages it seems to stay, passing through processes of a complexity inconceivable to men, but in all its forms, in all its stages, its energy ever and ever integrally present."


(
39.95,-75.16666667
)

736451
2
2
736451
736451
1
736451


" There is something within me that might be illusion as it is often case with young delighted people, but if I would be fortunate to achieve some of my ideals, it would be on the behalf of the whole of humanity. If those hopes would become fulfilled, the most exciting thought would be that it is a deed of a Serb."


736450
1
1
736450
736450
0
736450


" Throughout space there is energy. Is this energy static or kinetic! If static our hopes are in vain; if kinetic — and this we know it is, for certain — then it is a mere question of time when men will succeed in attaching their machinery to the very wheelwork of nature."


(
51.5,-0.133333333
)

736449
1
1
736449
736449
0
736449


" Ere many generations pass, our machinery will be driven by a power obtainable at any point of the universe. This idea is not novel. Men have been led to it long ago by instinct or reason; it has been expressed in many ways, and in many places, in the history of old and new. We find it in the delightful myth of Antheus, who derives power from the earth; we find it among the subtle speculations of one of your splendid mathematicians and in many hints and statements of thinkers of the present time"


(
51.5,-0.133333333
)

736448
1
2
736448
736448
0
736448


" Alternate currents, especially of high frequencies, pass with astonishing freedom through even slightly rarefied gases. The upper strata of the air are rarefied. To reach a number of miles out into space requires the overcoming of difficulties of a merely mechanical nature."


(
51.5,-0.133333333
)

736447
1
2
736447
736447
0
736447


" Though we have no positive evidence of a charged body existing in space without other oppositely electrified bodies being near, there is a fair probability that the earth is such a body, for by whatever process it was separated from other bodies — and this is the accepted view of its origin — it must have retained a charge, as occurs in all processes of mechanical separation."


736446
1
2
736446
736446
0
736446


" A point of great importance would be first to know: what is the capacity of the earth? And what charge does it contain if electrified?"


736445
1
3
736445
736445
1
736445


" My dear Mrs. Johnson, What is the matter with inkspiller Kipling? He actually dared to invite me to dine in an obscure hotel where I would be sure to get hair and cockroaches in the soup. Yours truly, N. Tesla"


736441
1
1
736441
736441
0
736441

in 2004

" It's hard to explain but I have a need to play intensely every day, to fight every match hard. And this desire never to stop fighting is something else I learnt in the place where I grew up."


735979
1
1
735979
735979
0
735979

in 2004

" I was lucky to come from a difficult area. It teaches you not just about football but also life. There were lots of kids from different races and poor families. People had to struggle to get through the day. Music was important. Football was the easy part."


735978
1
1
735978
735978
0
735978

in 2004

" It was my father who taught us that an immigrant must work twice as hard as anybody else, that he must never give up."


735977
1
1
735977
735977
0
735977


" Sometimes I don't know what takes me over during a game. Sometimes I just feel I have moved to a different place and I can make the pass, score the goal or go past my marker at will."


735976
1
1
735976
735976
0
735976

in 1950

" We can only see a short distance ahead, but we can see plenty there that needs to be done."


735973
1
1
735973
735973
0
735973

in 1950

" The view that machines cannot give rise to surprises is due, I believe, to a fallacy to which philosophers and mathematicians are particularly subject. This is the assumption that as soon as a fact is presented to a mind all consequences of that fact spring into the mind simultaneously with it. It is a very useful assumption under many circumstances, but one too easily forgets that it is false."


735972
1
1
735972
735972
0
735972

in 1950

" I am not very impressed with theological arguments whatever they may be used to support. Such arguments have often been found unsatisfactory in the past. "


735971
1
1
735971
735971
0
735971

in 1950

" I believe that at the end of the century the use of words and general educated opinion will have altered so much that one will be able to speak of machines thinking without expecting to be contradicted."


735970
1
1
735970
735970
0
735970

in 1950

" The idea behind digital computers may be explained by saying that these machines are intended to carry out any operations which could be done by a human computer."


735969
1
1
735969
735969
0
735969

in 1950

" We are not asking whether all digital computers would do well in the game nor whether the computers at present available would do well, but whether there are imaginable computers which would do well."


735968
1
1
735968
735968
0
735968

in 1950

" May not machines carry out something which ought to be described as thinking but which is very different from what a man does?"


735967
1
1
735967
735967
0
735967

in 1950

" We do not wish to penalise the machine for its inability to shine in beauty competitions, nor to penalise a man for losing in a race against an aeroplane. The conditions of our game make these disabilities irrelevant."


735966
1
1
735966
735966
0
735966


" A man provided with paper, pencil, and rubber, and subject to strict discipline, is in effect a universal machine."


735965
1
1
735965
735965
0
735965

in 1946

" Instruction tables will have to be made up by mathematicians with computing experience and perhaps a certain puzzle-solving ability. There need be no real danger of it ever becoming a drudge, for any processes that are quite mechanical may be turned over to the machine itself."


735964
1
1
735964
735964
0
735964

in 1938

" Mathematical reasoning may be regarded rather schematically as the exercise of a combination of two facilities, which we may call intuition and ingenuity. The activity of the intuition consists in making spontaneous judgements which are not the result of conscious trains of reasoning... The exercise of ingenuity in mathematics consists in aiding the intuition through suitable arrangements of propositions, and perhaps geometrical figures or drawings."


735963
1
1
735963
735963
0
735963

in 1935

" The only way to enjoy anything in this life is to earn it first."


735156
3
1
735156
735156
0
735156

in 1955

" You don't get older, you get better."


735153
1
2
735153
735153
1
735153

in 1953

" I think the main reason my marriages failed is that I always loved too well but never wisely."


734826
1
2
734826
734826
1
734826

in 1940

" Be yourself. The world worships the original."


734567
1
3
734567
734567
0
734567

in 1929

" Life would be so wonderful if we only knew what to do with it."


733992
1
2
733992
733992
0
733992

in 1966

" I am simple, complex, generous, selfish, unattractive, beautiful, lazy, and driven"


733990
1
2
733990
733990
0
733990

in 1950

" The most important thing is to enjoy your life. To be happy. It's all that matters."


733978
1
2
733978
733978
0
733978

in 1964

" It's never too late. Never too late to start over, never too late to be happy."


733973
3
2
733973
733973
0
733973

to
in 2013

" I regard texture similar to the function of taste buds in our mouths. But in a visual form. Texture does create a specific flavour which affects our senses."

Panart Visual Arts Magazine


732888
3
1
732888
732888
0
732888

to
in 2014

" Most people don't like to be confronted with an actual fact-of-life because it's difficult to metabolize. A painting of a bowl of fruit is much easier. It's for the same reason why we don't like going to the doctor. The diagnosis and x-rays are too honest. This is what creates the perception that contemporary art is shocking or suspicious."

Adamo Macri: Sculptural Chameleon ArtBookGuy - Michael K. Corbin


732887
6
1
732887
732887
0
732887

to
in 2014

" Art exhibitions would be less censored if they were rated, G or NC-17, like movies. People in general see galleries and museums as family-appropriate excursions. Censorship is a provided system which caters to lazy parenting, which is publicly-funded and socially accepted."

Adamo Macri: Sculptural Chameleon ArtBookGuy - Michael K. Corbin


732886
6
1
732886
732886
0
732886

to
in 2013

" I do preach the idea of individualism as in not adapting any kind of style or model other than that one of your own. I always found it strange in art history when studying about the different guilds and movements. It sounded too contrived and having to follow devised parameters to create art. I personally am not a team player in that manner. The art should be labeled by the artist's name only."


732829
3
1
732829
732829
0
732829

in 1951

" I am not a has-been. I am a will be."


732754
1
1
732754
732754
0
732754

in 1929

" Life would be so wonderful if we only knew what to do with it"


732751
1
1
732751
732751
0
732751

in 1968

" We all require and want respect, man or woman, black or white. It's our basic human right."


732748
1
1
732748
732748
0
732748

in 1956

" Ingemar Stenmark , born March 18, 1956 in Joesjö , Västerbotten County , is one of history's premier alpine skiers with a total of two Olympic gold medals , five World Championship gold medals and 86 world cup victories in the disciplines of slalom and giant slalom "


732608
2
1
732608
732608
0
732608

in 1956

" Every age can be enchanting, provided you live within it."


732580
2
2
732580
732580
0
732580


" Mr. Watson, come here, I want to see you"


732306
2
1
732306
732306
0
732306

in 1947

" The secret of staying young is to live honestly, eat slowly, and lie about your age."


732169
2
3
732169
732169
0
732169

in 1973

" Government must learn to take less from people so that people can do more for themselves."


731834
2
4
731834
731834
0
731834


" Everything you see, I owe to spaghetti…"


731592
3
3
731592
731592
4
731592

in 1957

" One death is a tragedy one million is a statistic."


731282
3
3
731282
731282
0
731282


" With all due deference to separation of powers, last week, the Supreme Court reversed a century of law that I believe will open the floodgates for special interests, including foreign corporations, to spend without limit in our elections. I dont think American elections should be bankrolled by Americas most powerful interests, or worse, by foreign entities. They should be decided by the American people. Id urge Democrats and Republicans to pass a bill that helps correct some of these problems"


(
38.893728,-77.042827
)

730240
2
1
730240
730240
0
730240


" States like these and their terrorist allies constitute an axis of evil, arming to threaten the peace of the world. By seeking weapons of mass destruction, these regimes pose a grave and growing danger. They could provide these arms to terrorists, giving them the means to match their hatred. They could attack our allies or attempt to blackmail the United States. In any of these cases, the price of indifference would be catastrophic."


730238
4
1
730238
730238
0
730238


" We know big government does not have all the answers… The era of big Government is over. But we cannot go back to the time when our citizens were left to fend for themselves. Instead, we must go forward as one America, one nation working together to meet the challenges we face together."


730236
2
1
730236
730236
0
730236


" President Washington began this tradition in 1790 after reminding the Nation that the destiny of self-government and the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty is finally staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people. For our friends in the press, who place a high premium on accuracy, let me say: I did not actually hear George Washington say that."


730234
2
1
730234
730234
0
730234


" . I believe that I have provided all the material that he needs to conclude his investigations and to proceed to prosecute the guilty and to clear the innocent. I believe the time has come to bring that investigation and the other investigations of this matter to an end. One year of Watergate is enough."


730232
2
1
730232
730232
0
730232


" I would like to add a personal word with regard to an issue that has been of great concern to all Americans over the past year. I refer, of course, to the investigations of the so-called Watergate affair. As you know, I have provided to the Special Prosecutor voluntarily a great deal of material. "


730231
2
1
730231
730231
0
730231


" The third is freedom from want—which, translated into world terms, means economic understandings which will secure to every nation a healthy peacetime life for its inhabitants-everywhere in the world. The fourth is freedom from fear—which, translated into world terms, means a world-wide reduction of armaments to such a point and in such a thorough fashion that no nation will be in a position to commit an act of physical aggression against any neighbor—anywhere in the world"


730230
2
1
730230
730230
0
730230


" In the future days, which we seek to make secure, we look forward to a world founded upon four essential human freedoms. The first is freedom of speech and expression—everywhere in the world. The second is freedom of every person to worship God in his own way—everywhere in the world. "


730229
2
1
730229
730229
0
730229


" The accounts of the abundance of gold in that territory are of such an extraordinary character as would scarcely command belief were they not corroborated by the authentic reports of officers in the public service…The explorations already made warrant the belief that the supply is very large and that gold is found at various places in an extensive district of country."


730227
2
1
730227
730227
0
730227


" …The occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers….we should consider any attempt on their part to extend their system to any portion of this hemisphere as dangerous to our peace and safety"


730226
2
1
730226
730226
0
730226


" The fiery trial through which we pass will light us down in honor or dishonor to the latest generation. … In giving freedom to the slave we assure freedom to the free—honorable alike in what we give and what we preserve. We shall nobly save or meanly lose the last best hope of earth. Other means may succeed; this could not fail. The way is plain, peaceful, generous, just—a way which if followed the world will forever applaud and God must forever bless"


730225
2
1
730225
730225
0
730225

in 1967

" I think America must see that riots do not develop out of thin air. Certain conditions continue to exist in our society which must be condemned as vigorously as we condemn riots."


(
36.17,-119.7462
)

730185
3
1
730185
730185
0
730185


" There is nothing wrong with America that can not be cured by what is right with America."


(
38.893728,-77.042827
)

730183
4
1
730183
730183
0
730183

in 1963

" I believe in me. I’m a little screwed up but I’m beautiful."


729947
2
1
729947
729947
0
729947


" Nikita Khrushchev ...A short, relatively fat man who hardly fits our image of what the most powerful dictator in the world should be. How did this bulky fellow with the rotund face that might be that of a clown reach his present pinnacle?""


729939
2
1
729939
729939
0
729939


" I was confident of winning after the year I had but the other finalists also had good years. It can go along with the other Ballon d’Or trophies so I’m very happy."


729761
2
1
729761
729761
0
729761


" I have known men who have undoubtedly loved cars as much as I have. But I don’t think I’ve known any who have been as obstinate as I have, motivated by the same wholehearted passion that has left me without either the time or the inclination to do anything else. I have no other interests apart from racing cars"


729445
3
2
729445
729445
2
729445


" They know that if you go, for example, to FactCheck.com, an independent Web site sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania, you can get the specific details with respect to Halliburton."


728245
2
1
728245
728245
0
728245


" George Bush taking credit for the Berlin Wall coming down is like the rooster taking credit for the sunrise."


728244
3
1
728244
728244
0
728244


" No, I dont, Bernard. And I think you know that Ive opposed the death penalty during all of my life. I dont see any evidence that its a deterrent, and I think there are better and more effective ways to deal with violent crime."


728243
2
1
728243
728243
0
728243


" I have as much experience in the Congress as Jack Kennedy did when he sought the presidency."


728242
2
2
728242
728242
0
728242


" When I hear your new ideas, Im reminded of that ad, Wheres the beef?"


728240
2
1
728240
728240
0
728240


" Ask yourself, Are you better off now than you were four years ago? Is it easier for you to go and buy things in the stores than it was four years ago? Is there more or less unemployment in the country than there was four years ago? Is America as respected throughout the world as it was?"


728239
2
2
728239
728239
0
728239


" There is no Soviet domination of Eastern Europe, and there never will be under a Ford administration."


728238
2
1
728238
728238
0
728238


" There you go again."


728237
2
2
728237
728237
0
728237

in 1934

" My people are American, my time is today…music must repeat the thought and aspirations of the times."


727846
2
1
727846
727846
0
727846

in 1933

" I frequently hear music in the heart of noise."


727845
2
1
727845
727845
0
727845

in 1978

" Those who dont believe in magic will never find it"


726771
2
1
726771
726771
0
726771


" I am going to talk of controversial things. I make no apology for this..."


726685
3
2
726685
726685
0
726685


" This was very unpleasant and surprising for me. We talk to them [the Americans], and we assume they are decent people, but he [John Kerry] is lying and he knows that he is lying. This is sad. "


726429
2
1
726429
726429
0
726429

in 2005

" Above all, we should acknowledge that the collapse of the Soviet Union was a major geopolitical disaster of the century. As for the Russian nation, it became a genuine drama. Tens of millions of our co-citizens and compatriots found themselves outside Russian territory. Moreover, the epidemic of disintegration infected Russia itself. "


726428
8
4
726428
726428
0
726428


" We certainly would not want to have the same kind of democracy that they have in Iraq, quite honestly. "


726427
2
1
726427
726427
0
726427


" People in Russia say that those who do not regret the collapse of the Soviet Union have no heart, and those that do regret it have no brain. We do not regret this, we simply state the fact and know that we need to look ahead, not backwards. We will not allow the past to drag us down and stop us from moving ahead. We understand where we should move. But we must act based on a clear understanding of what happened.. "


726426
3
1
726426
726426
0
726426


" Why dont you meet Osama bin Laden, invite him to Brussels or to the White House and engage in talks, ask him what he wants and give it to him so he leaves you in peace? You find it possible to set some limitations in your dealings with these bastards, so why should we talk to people who are child-killers? No one has a moral right to tell us to talk to childkillers. "


726425
2
1
726425
726425
0
726425


" Two weeks later they still have not been found. The question is, where is Saddam Hussein? Where are those weapons of mass destruction, if they were ever in existence? Is Saddam Hussein in a bunker sitting on cases containing weapons of mass destruction, preparing to blow the whole place up? "


726424
2
2
726424
726424
0
726424

in 2002

" Russia does not have in its possession any trustworthy data that supports the existence of nuclear weapons or any weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and we have not received any such information from our partners as yet. "


726423
2
1
726423
726423
0
726423

in 2002

" Its not by chance that Russia and the U.S. forge an alliances in the most critical moments of modern history. That was the case in WWI and WWII even if there was fierce confrontation, our countries united against a common threat which means theres something that unites us. There must be some fundamental interest which bring us together. Thats something we need to focus on first. We need to be aware of out difference but focus on a positive agenda that can improve our cooperation. "


726422
2
1
726422
726422
0
726422

in 2013

" The U.S. is a very democratic state. Theres no doubt about that. And it originally developed as a democratic state. When the first settlers set their foot on the continent, life forced them to forge a relationship and maintain a dialogue with each other to survive. Thats why America was conceived as a fundamental democracy. "


726421
2
1
726421
726421
0
726421


" I bow my head to the victims of terrorism. I am highly impressed of the courage of New York residents. The great city and the great American nation are to win! "


(
40.66666667,-73.93333333
)

726420
2
1
726420
726420
0
726420


" It's difficult to talk to people who whisper even at home, afraid of Americans eavesdropping on them. Its not a figure of speech, not a joke, I'm serious."


726419
2
1
726419
726419
0
726419


" To pray to God Himself… but till then I don’t know God. Bury me and arise, break your chains And sprinkle your freedom With the enemy’s evil blood. And don’t forget to remember me In the great family, In a family new and free, With a kind and quiet word."


726391
2
1
726391
726391
0
726391


" When I die, bury me On a grave mound Amid the wide-wide steppe In my beloved Ukraine, In a place from where the wide-tilled fields And the Dnipro and its steep banks Can be seen and Its roaring rapids heard. When it carries off The enemy’s blood from Ukraine To the deep blue sea… I’ll leave The tilled fields and mountains— I’ll leave everything behind and ascend"


726390
2
1
726390
726390
0
726390

in 1845

" The days pass, the nights pass, As does summer. Yellowed leaves Rustle, eyes grow dim, Thoughts fall asleep, the heart sleeps, All has gone to rest, and I don’t know Whether I’m alive or will live, Or whether I’m rushing like this through the world, For I’m no longer weeping or laughing…"


726389
2
1
726389
726389
0
726389


" ... I see the first part as the expression of Canada's primitive life ... less refined ... in a language ... such as the language of the Huron ... I fused that to a centre that I call a meditation, in which you listen to ... all the acoustic sensibilities in nature, the calm, and I returned to the modern world with the words of St. Francis of Assisi ... and at the end I have echoes with the choirs ... which again give you the immense thing that dominates you."


726154
2
1
726154
726154
0
726154


" ... I wrote a symphony called Symphonie gaspésienne which expressed ... Canada's east, that is, the province of Quebec, and this work [Altitude] represents Canada's west, that is, the Rocky Mountains. And [these are] the impressions that I received ... upon seeing the Rocky Mountains, the mystery ... and all those things that impress you profoundly and [that] I took in unconsciously, filtered through my consciousness and expressed [themselves] through music."


726153
2
1
726153
726153
0
726153

in 1972

" ... and, after hearing Gaspésia ... it struck me as a kind of pastel, and that annoyed me, because I wanted to create an acoustic fresco; and that is why I began again with the same material, the same elements that I had developed, and I really did, [succeed] I think, [with] what I call the Symphonie gaspésienne"


726147
2
1
726147
726147
0
726147

in 1988

" That was what started my career as a composer, for he [Laliberté] decided that I should go to Europe. He knew Rachmaninoff very well, and after a concert [by the pianist] he and I dined with Rachmaninoff, and he showed him my symphonic poem, after which Rachmaninoff urged me to go into composition .... So that with one thing and another, the fact is that Laliberté actually started me on my career as composer. And it was his idea that I should go to Europe. I should say that when I left Mon"


726135
2
1
726135
726135
0
726135

in 1988

" We'd get together on the Saturday or Sunday evening, at an aunt or uncle's place. Everyone contributed his or her performance, singing or playing the violin or piano or some other instrument, and we often put on little plays. Because, I must say, in that family, the Champagne family, everyone loved the arts, especially theatre."


726130
2
1
726130
726130
0
726130

in 1988

" y mother had inherited a bit of those qualities, quite different from my father, who was a very exuberant man, whereas my mother was introspective and liked to meditate and daydream."


726129
2
1
726129
726129
0
726129

in 1988

" it seems she had a rather poetic side to her nature, something of an imaginative dreamer."


726128
2
1
726128
726128
0
726128

in 1988

" I was very fond of his jigs and other dance tunes, and spent whole afternoons listening to him play. They tell me that I found two little sticks and tried to catch the rhythm of his pieces. So much for a very early experience."


726127
2
1
726127
726127
0
726127


" Nonviolence is not sterile passivity, but a powerful moral force which makes for social transformation"


725949
3
1
725949
725949
0
725949


" I shall ask you to be as quiet as possible. I don't know whether you fully understand that I have just been shot; but it takes more than that to kill a Bull Moose."


725948
2
1
725948
725948
0
725948

in 1994

" This cd-rom can hold more information than all of the paper that's here below me"


725772
2
1
725772
725772
0
725772


" And yet, when I look up at the sky, I somehow feel that everything will change for the better, that this cruelty too will end, that peace and tranquility will return once more. In the meantime, I must hold on to my ideals. Perhaps the day will come when Ill be able to realize them. "


725751
2
1
725751
725751
0
725751


" Its utterly impossible for me to build my life on foundation of chaos, suffering and death. I see the world being slowly transformed into a wilderness, I hear the approaching thunder that, one day, will destroy us too, I feel the suffering of millions. ..."


725750
2
1
725750
725750
0
725750


" Ive reached the point where I hardly care whether I live or die. The world will keep on turning without me, and I cant do anything to change events anyway. Ill just let matters take their course and concentrate on studying and hope that everything will be all right in the end. "


725749
3
1
725749
725749
0
725749


" Mr. Bolkestein, the Cabinet Minister, speaking on the Dutch broadcast from London, said that after the war a collection would be made of diaries and letters dealing with the war. Of course, everyone pounced on my diary. "


725748
2
1
725748
725748
0
725748


" All college students are being asked to sign an official statement to the effect that they sympathize with the Germans and approve of the New Order. Eighty percent have decided to obey the dictates of their conscience, but the penalty will be severe. Any student refusing to sign will be sent to a German labor camp. "


725747
2
1
725747
725747
0
725747


" They often go around with lists, knocking only on those doors where they know theres a big haul to be made. They frequently offer a bounty, so much per head. Its like the slave hunts of the olden days… I feel wicked sleeping in a warm bed, while somewhere out there my dearest friends are dropping from exhaustion or being knocked to the ground. I get frightened myself when I think of close friends who are now at the mercy of the cruelest monsters ever to stalk the earth. "


725746
2
1
725746
725746
0
725746


" Mr. Dussel has told us much about the outside world weve missed for so long. He had sad news. Countless friends and acquaintances have been taken off to a dreadful fate. Night after night, green and gray military vehicles cruise the streets. They knock on every door, asking whether any Jews live there. If so, the whole family is immediately taken away. If not, they proceed to the next house. Its impossible to escape their clutches unless you go into hiding. "


725745
2
1
725745
725745
0
725745


" ...Had he heard something after all and did he now want to check out this mysterious looking bookcase? It seemed so, since he kept knocking, pulling, pushing and jerking on it. I was so scared I nearly fainted at the thought of this total stranger managing to discover our wonderful hiding place… "


725744
2
1
725744
725744
0
725744


" My hands still shaking, though its been two hours since we had the scare… The office staff stupidly forgot to warn us that the carpenter, or whatever hes called, was coming to fill the extinguishers… After working for about fifteen minutes, he laid his hammer and some other tools on our bookcase (or so we thought!) and banged on our door. We turned white with fear. "


725743
2
1
725743
725743
0
725743


" ...We assume that most of them are beingurdered. The English radio says theyre being gassed. Perhaps thats the quickest way to die. I feel terrible. Mieps accounts of these horrors are so heartrending… Fine specimens of humanity, those Germans, and to think Im actually one of them! No, thats not true, Hitler took away our nationality long ago. And besides, there are no greater enemies on earth than the Germans and Jews. "


725742
2
1
725742
725742
0
725742


" ... The people get almost nothing to eat, much less to drink, as water is available only one hour a day, and theres only one toilet and sink for several thousand people. Men and women sleep in the same room, and women and children often have their heads shaved. Escape is almost impossible; many people look Jewish, and theyre branded by their shorn heads. If its that bad in Holland, what must it be like in those faraway and uncivilized places where the Germans are sending them? ..."


725741
2
1
725741
725741
0
725741


" Today I have nothing but dismal and depressing news to report. Our many Jewish friends and acquaintances are being taken away in droves. The Gestapo is treating them very roughly and transporting them in cattle cars to Westerbork, the big camp in Drenthe to which theyre sending all the Jews. Miep told us about someone whod managed to escape from there. It must be terrible in Westerbork. "


725740
2
1
725740
725740
0
725740


" Now whenever we want to go downstairs we have to duck and then jump. After the first three days we were all walking around with bumps on our foreheads from banging our heads against the low doorway. Then Peter cushioned it by nailing a towel stuffed with wood shavings to the doorframe. Lets see if it helps! "


725739
2
1
725739
725739
0
725739


" Now our Secret Annex has truly become secret. Because so many houses are being searched for hidden bicycles, Mr. Kugler thought it would be better to have a bookcase built in front of the entrance to our hiding place. It swings out on its hinges and opens like a door. Mr. Voskuijl did the carpentry work. (Mr. Voskuijl has been told that the seven of us are in hiding, and hes been most helpful.)"


725738
2
1
725738
725738
0
725738


" To the left is a narrow hallway opening onto a room that serves as the Frank familys living room and bedroom. Next door is a smaller room, the bedroom and study of the two young ladies of the family. To the right of the stairs is a windowless washroom with a sink. The door in the corner leads to the toilet and another one to Margots and my room… Now Ive introduced you to the whole of our lovely Annex! "


725737
2
1
725737
725737
0
725737


" The door to the right of the landing leads to the Secret Annex at the back of the house. No one would ever suspect there were so many rooms behind that plain gray door. Theres just one small step in front of the door, and then youre inside. Straight ahead of you is a steep flight of stairs. "


725736
2
1
725736
725736
0
725736


" Heres a description of the building… A wooden staircase leads from the downstairs hallway to the third floor. At the top of the stairs is a landing, with doors on either side. The door on the left takes you up to the spice storage area, attic and loft in the front part of the house. A typically Dutch, very steep, ankle-twisting flight of stairs also runs from the front part of the house to another door opening onto the street. "


725735
2
1
725735
725735
0
725735


" The van Daans are going with us. There will be seven of us altogether. Silence. We couldnt speak. The thought of Father off visiting someone in the Jewish Hospital and completely unaware of what was happening, the long wait for Mother, the heat, the suspense – all this reduced us to silence"


725734
2
1
725734
725734
0
725734


" Visions of concentration camps and lonely cells raced through my head. How could we let Father go to such a fate? Of course hes not going, declared Margot as we waited for Mother in the living room. Mothers gone to Mr. van Daan to ask whether we can move to our hiding place tomorrow. "


725733
2
1
725733
725733
0
725733


" At three oclock (Hello had left but was supposed to come back later), the doorbell rang. I didnt hear it, since I was out on the balcony, lazily reading in the sun. A little while later Margot appeared in the kitchen doorway looking very agitated. Father has received a call-up notice from the SS, she whispered. Mother has gone to see Mr. van Daan (Mr. van Daan is Fathers business partner and a good friend.) I was stunned. A call-up: everyone knows what that means."


725732
2
1
725732
725732
0
725732


" Write no matter how tired you are, no matter how inconvenient it is; write if you are smashed up in the hospital; write when you are doing your most dangerous stunts; write when your work is most irksome and disheartening; write all the time!"


725053
2
1
725053
725053
0
725053


" From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic an "iron curtain" has descended across the continent. Behind that line lie all the capitals of the ancient states of Central and Eastern Europe. Warsaw, Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Belgrade, Bucharest and Sofia; all these famous cities and the populations around them lie in what I must call the Soviet sphere, and all are subject, in one form or another, not only to Soviet influence but to a very high and in some cases increasing measur"


724540
3
1
724540
724540
0
724540

in 1896

" Tell people that war is an evil, and they will laugh; for who does not know it? Tell them that patriotism is an evil, and most of them will agree, but with a reservation. Yes, they will say, wrong patriotism is an evil; but there is another kind, the kind we hold. But just what this good patriotism is, no one explains."


724466
2
1
724466
724466
0
724466

in 1895

" In all history there is no war which was not hatched by the governments, the governments alone, independent of the interests of the people, to whom war is always pernicious even when successful."


724465
2
1
724465
724465
0
724465

in 1892

" The more is given the less the people will work for themselves, and the less they work the more their poverty will increase."


724464
3
2
724464
724464
0
724464

in 1886

" The vocation of every man and woman is to serve other people."


724463
2
1
724463
724463
0
724463

in 1886

" I sit on a mans back, choking him, and making him carry me, and yet assure myself and others that I am very sorry for him and wish to ease his lot by any means possible, except getting off his back."


724462
3
1
724462
724462
0
724462

in 1884

" I know that my unity with all people cannot be destroyed by national boundaries and government orders."


724461
3
2
724461
724461
0
724461

in 1884

" Error is the force that welds men together; truth is communicated to men only by deeds of truth."


724460
2
1
724460
724460
0
724460

in 1855

" The hero of my tale, whom I love with all the power of my soul, whom I have tried to portray in all his beauty, who has been, is, and will be beautiful, is Truth."


724459
2
1
724459
724459
0
724459


" I think it would be an excellent thing for Anglo-American relations if you could visit the United States."


724048
2
1
724048
724048
0
724048


" I knew that we could not survive,However, when I got back to Washington, in my usual methodical way—people think it’s methodical and I guess it is—I decided I should put down the pros and cons of what options I had."


724030
2
1
724030
724030
0
724030


" I do not want a honeymoon with you. I want a good marriage"


(
38.88986,-77.009066
)

724025
2
1
724025
724025
0
724025


" I can’t begin to describe it and have become so enthusiastic that if I didn’t stop I would write all night. The two things that impress me most are the Culebra Cut, because of the colossal hole made in the ground, and the locks because of the engineering problems and size. Imagine an intricate concrete structure nearly a mile long and three or four hundred feet wide, with double gates of steel weighing 700 tons apiece!"


(
9,-80
)

724019
2
1
724019
724019
0
724019


" “But all, in a sense, are casualties, still abroad or absent without leave from the real America. I want them to come home if they want to work their way back…In my judgment, these young Americans should have a second chance to contribute their fair share to the rebuilding of peace among ourselves and with all nations."


724017
3
2
724017
724017
0
724017


" I stated my strong conviction that unconditional blanket amnesty for anyone who illegally evaded or fled military service is wrong"


724016
2
1
724016
724016
0
724016


" As a Republic dedicated to liberty and justice for all, this Nation cannot deny equal status to women"


724013
2
1
724013
724013
0
724013

in 1895

" In all history there is no war which was not hatched by the governments, the governments alone, independent of the interests of the people, to whom war is always pernicious even when successful."


723771
3
2
723771
723771
1
723771

in 1929

" If I were not a physicist, I would probably be a musician. I often think in music. I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music... I get most joy in life out of my violin"


723526
2
1
723526
723526
0
723526

in 1997

" Fate, I respect a lot. I never regret anything."


723166
2
1
723166
723166
0
723166


" Them Cubs, they ain’t gonna win no more."


722951
2
1
722951
722951
0
722951


" Ocian in view! O! the joy"


(
46.028123,-122.967828
)

722357
2
1
722357
722357
0
722357


" This day I completed my thirty first year, and conceived that I had in all human probability now existed about half the period which I am to remain in this Sublunary world. I reflected that I had as yet done but little, very little indeed, to further the hapiness of the human race, or to advance the information of the succeeding generation."


722331
2
1
722331
722331
0
722331

in 1921

" The wireless music box has no imaginable commercial value. Who would pay for a message sent to no one in particular?"


721971
2
1
721971
721971
0
721971

in 1946

" Television will not last because people will soon get tired of staring at a plywood box every night"


721970
2
1
721970
721970
0
721970

in 1943

" I think the is a world market for maybe five computers."


721969
2
1
721969
721969
0
721969

in 1932

" There is not the slightest indication that nuclear energy will ever be obtainable. It would mean that the atom would have to be shattered at will."


721968
4
1
721968
721968
0
721968


" I have never been a quitter. To leave office before my term is completed is abhorrent to every instinct in my body. But as President, I must put the interests of America first. America needs a full-time President and a full-time Congress, particular"


716806
2
1
716806
716806
0
716806


" America cannot be defeated."


716724
2
1
716724
716724
0
716724


" We may show mercy. We shall ask none."


716718
3
2
716718
716718
0
716718

in 1956

" I would have to know for once and for all what rights I had as a human being and a citizen."


716646
2
1
716646
716646
0
716646

in 1987

" When he saw me still sitting, he asked if I was going to stand up, and I said, No, I m not. And he said, Well, if you don t stand up, I m going to have to call the police and have you arrested. I said, You may do that."


716645
2
1
716645
716645
0
716645


" ...I believe this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth."


716236
2
1
716236
716236
0
716236


" Curtain! Fast music! Lights! Ready for the last finale! Great! The show looks good. The show looks good."


716021
2
1
716021
716021
0
716021


" I still live.... Poetry!"


716020
2
1
716020
716020
0
716020


" This is no time for making enemies"


716019
2
1
716019
716019
0
716019


" Don't let it end like this. Tell them I said something."


716018
2
1
716018
716018
0
716018


" But the peasants ... how do the peasants die?"


716017
3
3
716017
716017
0
716017


" I've had eighteen straight whiskies, I think that's the record."


716016
2
1
716016
716016
0
716016


" My head, my head!"


716015
2
1
716015
716015
0
716015


" Dying is easy, comedy is hard"


716014
2
1
716014
716014
0
716014


" Everybody has got to die, but I have always believed an exception would be made in my case. Now what?"


716013
2
1
716013
716013
0
716013


" I owe much; I have nothing; the rest I leave to the poor."


716012
2
1
716012
716012
0
716012


" Bring down the curtain, the farce is played out."


716011
2
1
716011
716011
0
716011


" Wait a second."


716010
2
1
716010
716010
0
716010


" Get my swan costume ready."


716009
2
1
716009
716009
0
716009


" Tomorrow, I shall no longer be here."


716008
2
1
716008
716008
0
716008


" It has all been very interesting."


716007
2
1
716007
716007
0
716007


" Last words are for fools who haven't said enough."


716005
3
1
716005
716005
0
716005

in 1981

" Money can't buy life ."


716003
2
1
716003
716003
0
716003

in 1996

" Why not? Why not? Why not? Why not? Yeah."


716001
2
1
716001
716001
0
716001


" Kill me, or else you are a murderer!"


715999
2
1
715999
715999
0
715999


" Does nobody understand?"


715998
2
1
715998
715998
0
715998


" You've got to stop this war in Afghanistan"


715997
2
1
715997
715997
0
715997


" Love one another ."


715996
2
1
715996
715996
0
715996


" More light!"


715995
2
1
715995
715995
0
715995


" I'm tired."


715994
2
1
715994
715994
0
715994


" Why is it so difficult to die?"


715993
2
1
715993
715993
0
715993


" I must go in, for the fog is rising."


715992
2
1
715992
715992
0
715992


" That guy's got to stop.... He'll see us."


715991
2
1
715991
715991
0
715991


" Damn it . . . Dont you dare ask God to help me!"


715990
2
1
715990
715990
0
715990


" What an irreparable loss!"


715989
2
1
715989
715989
0
715989

in 1904

" It's been a long time since I've had champagne."


715988
2
1
715988
715988
0
715988

in 1878

" Whose house is this? What street are we in? Why did you bring me here?"


715987
2
1
715987
715987
0
715987


" Do you know where I can get any shit?"


715986
2
1
715986
715986
0
715986


" I'm going away tonight"


715985
2
1
715985
715985
0
715985


" I am about to--or I am going to--die; either expression is used."


715984
2
1
715984
715984
0
715984


" I should never have switched from Scotch to Martinis."


715983
2
1
715983
715983
0
715983


" Friends, applaud, the comedy is over."


715982
2
1
715982
715982
0
715982


" Oh God, here I go."


715981
2
1
715981
715981
0
715981


" Codeine . . . bourbon."


715980
2
1
715980
715980
0
715980


" Nothing but death."


715979
2
1
715979
715979
0
715979

in 1964

" Am I dying or is this my birthday?"


715978
3
1
715978
715978
0
715978


" Pardonnez-moi, monsieur."


715977
2
1
715977
715977
0
715977

in 1938

" I'm bored. I'm bored."


715976
2
1
715976
715976
0
715976

in 1142

" I don't know"


715975
2
1
715975
715975
0
715975


" I am, therefore, asking the Congress to enact legislation giving all Americans the right to be served in facilities which are open to the public -- hotels, restaurants, theaters, retail stores, and similar establishments. This seems to me to be an e"


715778
2
1
715778
715778
0
715778

in 1989

" You can’t use up creativity. The more you use, the more you have."


715459
2
1
715459
715459
0
715459


" Without courage we cannot practice any other virtue with consistency. We can't be kind, true, merciful, generous, or honest."


715458
2
1
715458
715458
0
715458

in 1964

" It's the ballot or the bullet. It's liberty or it's death. It's freedom for everybody or freedom for nobody."


715190
4
1
715190
715190
0
715190

in 1946

" Women who stepped up were measured as citizens of the nation, not as women… this was a peoples war, and everyone was in it"


715081
4
4
715081
715081
0
715081


" This is a solemn but glorious hour. General Eisenhower informs me that the forces of Germany have surrendered to the United Nations. The flags of freedom fly all over Europe."


714888
5
1
714888
714888
0
714888

in 1600

" To be or not to be, that is the question."


714450
2
1
714450
714450
0
714450

in 1592

" A horse! A horse! My kingdom for a horse!"


714449
2
1
714449
714449
0
714449

in 1592

" Now is the winter of our discontent."


714448
2
1
714448
714448
0
714448

in 1594

" Beauty itself doth of itself persuade The eyes of men without an orator."


714447
2
1
714447
714447
0
714447


" There is no justice among men."


714368
3
2
714368
714368
2
714368


" That fat Rodzianko has again sent me some nonsense to which I will not even reply."


714367
2
1
714367
714367
0
714367


" The word impossible is not French."


714249
2
1
714249
714249
0
714249


" From the sublime to the ridiculous is but a step."


714248
4
1
714248
714248
0
714248


" From the heights of these pyramids, forty centuries look down on us"


714247
3
2
714247
714247
0
714247


" The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."


714143
5
1
714143
714143
0
714143


" A republic cannot succeed, till it contains a certain body of men imbued with the principles of justice and honour."


714137
3
2
714137
714137
1
714137


" And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you — ask what you can do for your country."


714134
4
1
714134
714134
0
714134

in 9

" Quintili Vare, legiones redde!"


714133
3
2
714133
714133
0
714133

in -52

" Galia est pacata"


714132
2
1
714132
714132
0
714132


" The die is cast"


714131
3
1
714131
714131
0
714131

in -47

" Veni, vidi, vici."


714130
2
1
714130
714130
0
714130


" It is common sense to take a method and try it. If it fails, admit it frankly and try another. But above all, try something. "


714129
3
1
714129
714129
0
714129


" Happiness lies not in the mere possession of money; it lies in the joy of achievement, in the thrill of creative effort. "


714128
2
1
714128
714128
0
714128


" The British are coming"


714125
2
1
714125
714125
0
714125


"Driven from every other corner of the earth, freedom of thought and the right of private judgment in matters of conscience direct their course to this happy country as their last asylum. "


-347900
2
0
-347900
-347900
0
-347900


"?ave a meeting."


-347901
2
0
-347901
-347901
0
-347901

on 0/1913

"?e is permission?in an era when ?development,? ?evolution,? is the scientific word?to interpret the Constitution according to the Darwinian principle; all they ask is recognition of the fact that a nation is a living thing and not a machine.[Progressive]"


-347902
2
0
-347902
-347902
0
-347902

on 0/1835

"?nique agent and sole arbiter of that; it provides for their security, foresees and secures their needs, facilitates their pleasures, conducts their principal affairs, directs their industry, regulates their estates, divides their inheritances: can it not take away from them entirely the trouble of thinking and the pain of living? So it is that every day it renders the employment of the free will less useful and more rare. It does not destroy, it prevents things from being born; it does not tyra"


-347903
2
0
-347903
-347903
0
-347903

on 0/1778

"?ed to justify the control, as any consent in this case is void."


-347904
2
0
-347904
-347904
0
-347904

on 0/1782

"?m the dust, his condition mollifying, the way I hope preparing, under the auspices of heaven, for a total emancipation, and that this is disposed, in the order of events, to be with the consent of the masters, rather than by their extirpation."


-347905
2
0
-347905
-347905
0
-347905


"?of sin and corruption are subjected to the worst kind of tyranny in the universe. Hence we conclude that where licentiousness begins, liberty ends."


-347906
2
0
-347906
-347906
0
-347906


"?protection of their common liberty."


-347907
2
0
-347907
-347907
0
-347907


"? him with an inviolable right to personal liberty, and personal safety . . . . The Sacred Rights of Mankind are not to be rummaged for, among old parchments, or musty records. They are written, as with a sun beam, in the whole volume of human nature, by the Hand of the Divinity itself; and can never be erased or obscured by mortal power."


-347908
2
0
-347908
-347908
0
-347908


"?the dupe of cunning; and passion the slave of sophistry and declamation."


-347909
2
0
-347909
-347909
0
-347909


"?ssions, be denied any signification whatsoever? For what purpose could the enumeration of particular powers be inserted, if these and all others were meant to be included in the preceding general power? . . . the idea of an enumeration of particulars, which neither explain nor qualify the general meaning, and can have no other effect than to confound and mislead, is an absurdity . . . ."


-347910
2
0
-347910
-347910
0
-347910


"?assumed its rank among the Nations."


-347911
2
0
-347911
-347911
0
-347911


"?ared to move forward, in the implementation of these rights, to new goals of human happiness and well-being."


-347912
2
0
-347912
-347912
0
-347912


"?, avoiding the last, and uniting a speedy, but temperate vigilance against encroachments, with an inviolable respect to the Laws."


-347913
2
0
-347913
-347913
0
-347913


"?ill be entirely their own."


-347914
2
0
-347914
-347914
0
-347914


"?eactionary. Their ideas are not more modern, but more ancient, than those of the Revolutionary fathers."


-347915
2
0
-347915
-347915
0
-347915


"?hool."


-347916
2
0
-347916
-347916
0
-347916


"?e predominant sense of the people of the United States. 4. the Valedictory address of President Washington, as conveying political lessons of peculiar value."


-347917
2
0
-347917
-347917
0
-347917


"?htened reason. But a nation of philosophers is as little to be expected as the philosophical race of kings wished for by Plato. And in every other nation, the most rational government will not find it a superfluous advantage, to have the prejudices of the community on its side."


-347918
2
0
-347918
-347918
0
-347918

in 1903

"[N]ot only are men created unequal?but this very inequality must be regarded as one of the essential conditions of human progress . . . . This fundamental fact that individuals or races are unequal is not an argument against, but rather in favor of, social and political advancement.?[Progressive]"


-347919
2
0
-347919
-347919
0
-347919


"[T]o instruct the mass of our citizens in these, their rights, interests and duties, as men and citizens?this brings us to the point at which are to commence the higher branches of education . . . . To develop the reasoning faculties of our youth, enlarge their minds, cultivate their morals, and instill into them the precepts of virtue and order."


-347920
2
0
-347920
-347920
0
-347920

in 1794

"It is a fool only, and not the philosopher, nor even the prudent man, that will live as if there were no God? Were a man impressed as fully and strongly as he ought to be with the belief of a God, his moral life would be regulated by the force of belief; he would stand in awe of God and of himself, and would not do the thing that could not be concealed from either."


-347921
2
0
-347921
-347921
0
-347921

in 1766

"Kings or parliaments could not give the rights essential to happiness, as you confess those invaded by the Stamp Act to be?They are not annexed to us by parchments and seals. They are created in us by the decrees of Providence, which establish the laws of our nature. They are born with us; exist with us; and cannot be taken from us by any human power, without taking our lives. In short, they are founded on the immutable maxims of reason and justice."


-347922
2
0
-347922
-347922
0
-347922


"There was a time when we were told . . . that a sense of common interest would preside over the conduct of the respective members?This language at the present day would appear as wild as that great part of what we now hear from the same quarter will be thought, when we shall have received further lessons from that best oracle of wisdom, experience."


-347923
2
0
-347923
-347923
0
-347923


"I expect we shall be told, that the Militia of the country is its natural bulwark, and would be at all times equal to the national defence?The facts, which from our own experience forbid a reliance of this kind, are too recent to permit us to be the dupes of such a suggestion."


-347924
2
0
-347924
-347924
0
-347924


"I cannot accept this invitation [to celebrate the bicentenial of the Constitution], for I do not believe that the meaning of the Constitution was forever ?fixed? at the Philadelphia Convention? To the contrary, the government they devised was defective from the start.?[Progressive]"


-347925
2
0
-347925
-347925
0
-347925


"This position will not be disputed, so long as it is admitted that the desire of reward is one of the strongest incentives of human conduct, or that the best security for the fidelity of mankind is to make their interest coincide with their duty. Even the love of fame, the ruling passion of the noblest minds?would on the contrary deter him from the undertaking, when he foresaw that he must quit the scene before he could accomplish the work . . ."


-347926
2
0
-347926
-347926
0
-347926


"The aim of every political Constitution is or ought to be first to obtain for rulers, men who possess most wisdom to discern, and most virtue to pursue the common good of the society; and in the next place, to take the most effectual precautions for keeping them virtuous, whilst they continue to hold their public trust?The most effectual one is such a limitation of the term of appointments, as will maintain a proper responsibility to the people."


-347927
2
0
-347927
-347927
0
-347927


"Another defect to be supplied by a senate lies in a want of due acquaintance with the objects and principles of legislation . . . no small share of the present embarrassments of America is to be charged on the blunders of our governments; and that these have proceeded from the heads rather than the hearts of most of the members of them. What indeed are all the repealing, explaining, and amending laws . . . but so many monuments of deficient wisdom?A good government implies two things; first, fid"


-347928
2
0
-347928
-347928
0
-347928


"The interpretation of the laws is the proper and peculiar province of the courts. A constitution is, in fact, and must be regarded by the judges, as fundamental law. It therefore belongs to them to ascertain its meaning, as well as the meaning of any particular act proceeding from the legislative body. If there should happen to be an irreconcilable variance between the two, that which has the superior obligation and validity ought, of course, to be preferred; or, in other words, the Constitution"


-347929
2
0
-347929
-347929
0
-347929


"In the words of Thomas Paine: These are times that try mens souls. We need more than summer soldiers and sunshine patriots. If we believe in principles of free enterprise that made our country great, we must stand up for them again today. We must draw anew on the individual strength, ingenuity, and vision that built America. But our gaze is not set on the past; its firmly fixed on tomorrow. We must not mortgage our childrens future to pay for the mistakes of today. The choice before our generati"


-347930
2
0
-347930
-347930
0
-347930


"This instance is selected from among a multitude that might be cited to confirm the truth already advanced and illustrated by domestic examples; which is, that nations pay little regard to rules and maxims designed in their very nature to run counter to the necessities of society. Wise politicians will be cautious about fettering the government with restrictions, that cannot be observed; because they know that every breach of the fundamental laws, though dictated by necessity, impairs that sacre"


-347931
2
0
-347931
-347931
0
-347931


"All the property that is necessary to a Man, for the Conservation of the Individual and the Propagation of the Species, is his natural Right, which none can justly deprive him of: But all Property superfluous to such purposes is the Property of the Publick, who, by their Laws, have created it, and who may therefore by other laws dispose of it, whenever the Welfare of the Publick shall demand such Disposition. He that does not like civil Society on these Terms, let him retire and live among Savag"


-347932
2
0
-347932
-347932
0
-347932


"The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the federal government are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State governments are numerous and indefinite. The former will be exercised principally on external objects, as war, peace, negotiation, and foreign commerce; with which last the power of taxation will, for the most part, be connected. The powers reserved to the several states will extend to all the objects which, in the ordinary course of affairs, concern the lives, "


-347933
2
0
-347933
-347933
0
-347933


"As a very important source of strength and security, cherish public credit. One method of preserving it is to use it as sparingly as possible: avoiding occasions of expence by cultivating peace, but remembering also that timely disbursements to prepare for danger frequently prevent much greater disbursements to repel it; avoiding likewise the accumulation of debt, not only by shunning occasions of expence, but by vigorous exertions in time of Peace to discharge the Debts which unavoidable wars m"


-347934
2
0
-347934
-347934
0
-347934


"In a single republic, all the power surrendered by the people, is submitted to the administration of a single government; and usurpations are guarded against by a division of the government into distinct and separate departments. In the compound republic of America, the power surrendered by the people, is first divided between two distinct governments, and then the portion allotted to each, subdivided among distinct and separate departments. Hence a double security arises on the rights of the pe"


-347935
2
0
-347935
-347935
0
-347935

in 1778

"Our present form of government is every way preferable to the royal one we have lately renounced. It is much more favorable to purity of morals, and better calculated to promote all our important interests . . . . Royal courts are reservoirs, from whence insincerity, hypocrisy, dissimulation, pride, luxury, and extravagance deluge and overwhelm the body of the people. On the other hand, republics are favorable to truth, sincerity, frugality, industry, and simplicity of manners. Equality, the lif"


-347936
2
0
-347936
-347936
0
-347936


"It seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force. If there be any truth in the remark, the crisis at which we are arrived may with propriety be regarded as the era in which that decision is to be made; and a w"


-347937
2
0
-347937
-347937
0
-347937


"The qualifications proposed for senators, as distinguished from those of representatives, consist in a more advanced age, and a longer period of citizenship. A senator must be thirty years of age at least; as representative, must be twenty-five. And the former must have been a citizen nine years; as seven years are required for the latter. The propriety of these distinctions is explained by the nature of the senatorial trust; which requiring greater extent of information and stability of charact"


-347938
2
0
-347938
-347938
0
-347938


"All of us who were engaged in the struggle must have observed frequent instances of superintending providence in our favor. To that kind providence we owe this happy opportunity of consulting in peace on the means of establishing our future national felicity. And have we now forgotten that powerful friend? Or do we imagine that we no longer need his assistance? I have lived, Sir, a long time, and the longer I live, the more convincing proofs I see of this truth-that God governs in the affairs of"


-347939
2
0
-347939
-347939
0
-347939


"I should put an ever stronger emphasis on the desirability of the largest possible independence between government and business. Each ought to be sovereign in its own sphere. When government comes unduly under the influence of business, the tendency is to develop an administration which closes the door of opportunity; becomes narrow and selfish in its outlook, and results in an oligarchy. When government enters the field of business with its great resources, it has a tendency to extravagance and"


-347940
2
0
-347940
-347940
0
-347940


"The complete independence of the courts of justice is peculiarly essential in a limited Constitution. By a limited Constitution, I understand one which contains certain specified exceptions to the legislative authority; such, for instance, as that it shall pass no bills of attainder, no ex-post-facto laws, and the like. Limitations of this kind can be preserved in practice no other way than through the medium of courts of justice, whose duty it must be to declare all acts contrary to the manifes"


-347941
2
0
-347941
-347941
0
-347941


"The authorities essential to the common defense are these: to raise armies; to build and equip fleets; to prescribe rules for the government of both; to direct their operations? to provide for their support. These powers ought to exist without limitation, because it is impossible to foresee or define the extent and variety of national exigencies, and the correspondent extent and variety of the means which may be necessary to satisfy them. The circumstances that endanger the safety of nations are"


-347942
2
0
-347942
-347942
0
-347942

in 1915

"Germany is the modern state which provides the greatest facilities for general ideas to take effect through social inculcation. Its system of ideas is adapted to that end. Higher schools and universities are really, not just nominally, under the control of the state and part of the state life . . . . Moreover, one of the chief functions of the universities is the preparation of future state officers. Legislative activity is distinctively subordinate to that of administration conducted by a train"


-347943
2
0
-347943
-347943
0
-347943


"This was the object of the Declaration of Independence. Not to find out new principles, or new arguments, never before thought of, not merely to say things which had never been said before; but to place before mankind the common sense of the subject, in terms so plain and firm as to command their assent, and to justify ourselves in the independent stand we are compelled to take. Neither aiming at originality of principle or sentiment, nor yet copied from any particular and previous writing, it w"


-347944
2
0
-347944
-347944
0
-347944


"But where says some is the King of America? Ill tell you Friend, he reigns above, and doth not make havoc of mankind like the Royal Brute of Britain . . . let it be brought forth placed on the divine law, the word of God; let a crown be placed thereon, by which the world may know, that so far as we approve of monarchy, that in America THE LAW IS KING. For as in absolute governments the King is law, so in free countries the law ought to be king; and there ought to be no other. But lest any ill us"


-347945
3
1
-347945
-347945
1
-347945


"It would be absurd to say, first, that Congress may do what they please and then that they may do this or that particular thing. After giving Congress power to raise money, and apply it to all purposes which they may pronounce necessary to the general welfare, it would be absurd, to say the least, to supersede a power to raise armies, to provide fleets, etc. In fact, the meaning of the general terms in question must either be sought in the subsequent enumerations which limits and details them, o"


-347946
2
0
-347946
-347946
0
-347946

in 1934

"Liberalism is committed to the idea of historic relativity. It knows that the content of the individual and freedom change with time; that this is as true of social change as it is of individual development from infancy to maturity. The positive counterpart of opposition to doctrinal absolutism is experimentalism. The connection between historic relativity and experimental method is intrinsic. Time signifies change. The significance of individuality with respect to social policies alters with ch"


-347947
2
0
-347947
-347947
0
-347947


"As there is a degree of depravity in mankind which requires a certain degree of circumspection and distrust, so there are other qualities in human nature, which justify a certain portion of esteem and confidence. Republican government presupposes the existence of these qualities in a higher degree than any other form. Were the pictures which have been drawn by the political jealousy of some among us, faithful likenesses of the human character, the inference would be that there is not sufficient "


-347948
2
0
-347948
-347948
0
-347948


"But what is of most importance is the high sanction given to a latitude in expounding the Constitution which seems to break down the landmarks intended by a specification of the Powers of Congress, and to substitute for a definite connection between means and ends, a legislative discretion as to the former to which no practical limit can be assigned. In the great system of Political Economy having for its general object the national welfare, everything is related immediately or remotely to every"


-347949
2
0
-347949
-347949
0
-347949

in 1776

"Each individual of the society has a right to be protected by it in the enjoyment of his life, liberty, and property, according to standing laws. He is obliged, consequently, to contribute his share to the expense of this protection; and to give his personal service, or an equivalent, when necessary. But no part of the property of any individual can, with justice, be taken from him, or applied to public uses, without his own consent, or that of the representative body of the people. In fine, the"


-347950
2
0
-347950
-347950
0
-347950

in 1781

"But of all the views of this law none is more important, none more legitimate, than that of rendering the people the safe, as they are the ultimate, guardians of their own liberty. For this purpose the reading in the first stage, where they will receive their whole education, is proposed, as has been said, to be chiefly historical. History by apprising them of the past will enable them to judge of the future; it will avail them of the experience of other times and other nations; it will qualify "


-347951
2
0
-347951
-347951
0
-347951


"My fondest hope for each one of you ? and especially for the young people here ? is that you will love your country, not for her power or wealth, but for her selflessness and her idealism. May each of you have the heart to conceive, the understanding to direct, and the hand to execute works that will make the world a little better for your having been here. May all of you as Americans never forget your heroic origins, never fail to seek divine guidance, and never lose your natural, God-given opt"


-347952
2
0
-347952
-347952
0
-347952


"They are of the People, and return again to mix with the People, having no more durable preeminence than the different Grains of Sand in an Hourglass. Such an Assembly cannot easily become dangerous to Liberty. They are the Servants of the People, sent together to do the Peoples Business, and promote the public Welfare; their Powers must be sufficient, or their Duties cannot be performed. They have no profitable Appointments, but a mere Payment of daily Wages, such as are scarcely equivalent to "


-347953
2
0
-347953
-347953
0
-347953


"The duty of holding a Neutral conduct may be inferred, without any thing more, from the obligation which justice and humanity impose on every nation, in cases in which it is free to act, to maintain inviolate the relations of Peace and amity toward other Nations. The inducements of interest for observing that conduct will best be referred to your own reflections and experience. With me, a predominant motive has been to endeavour to gain time to our country to settle and mature its recent institu"


-347954
2
0
-347954
-347954
0
-347954


"I know now what Im about to say will be very controversial, but I also believe that Gods greatest gift is human life and that we have a sacred duty to protect the innocent human life of an unborn child. Now I realize that this view is not shared by all. But out of all the debate on this subject has come one undisputed fact, and this, out of the debate, has been the uncertainty of when life begins. And I just happen to believe that simple morality dictates that unless and until someone can prove "


-347955
2
0
-347955
-347955
0
-347955

in 1776

"[An individual] generally, indeed, neither intends to promote the public interest, nor knows how much he is promoting it. By preferring the support of domestic to that of foreign industry, he intends only his own security; and by directing that industry in such a manner as its produce may be of the greatest value, he intends only his own gain, and he is in this, as in many other cases, led by an invisible hand to promote an end which was no part of his intention. Nor is it always the worse for t"


-347956
2
0
-347956
-347956
0
-347956


". . . it is of definite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned, and indignantly f"


-347957
2
0
-347957
-347957
0
-347957


"The citizens of the United States of America have the right to applaud themselves for having given to mankind examples of an enlarged and liberal policy worthy of imitation. All possess alike liberty of conscience and immunities of citizenship. It is now no more that toleration is spoken of as if it were the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights, for happily the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to "


-347958
2
0
-347958
-347958
0
-347958

in 1833

"Another not unimportant consideration is, that the powers of the general government will be, and indeed must be, principally employed upon external objects, such as war, peace, negotiations with foreign powers, and foreign commerce. In its internal operations it can touch but few objects, except to introduce regulations beneficial to the commerce, intercourse, and other relations, between the states, and to lay taxes for the common good. The powers of the states, on the other hand, extend to all"


-347959
2
0
-347959
-347959
0
-347959

in 1807

"We are, heart and soul, friends to the freedom of the press. It is however, the prostituted companion of liberty, and somehow or other, we know not how, its efficient auxiliary. It follows the substance like its shade; but while a man walks erect, he may observe that his shadow is almost always in the dirt. It corrupts, it deceives, it inflames. It strips virtue of her honors, and lends to faction its wildfire and its poisoned arms, and in the end is its own enemy and the usurpers ally, It would"


-347960
2
0
-347960
-347960
0
-347960


"Our own Countrys Honor, all call upon us for a vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble Actions - The Eyes of all our Countrymen are now upon us, and we shall have their blessings, and praises, if happily we are the instruments of saving them from the Tyranny mediated again"


-347961
2
0
-347961
-347961
0
-347961

in 1675

"[T]hose rights and privileges which I call English, and which are the proper birth-right of Englishmen, and may be reduced to these three. I. An ownership, and undisturbed possession: that what they have is rightly theirs, and no bodys else. II. A voting of every law that is made, whereby that ownership or propriety may be maintained. III. An influence upon, and a real share in, that judicatory power that must apply every such law; which is the ancient, necessary and laudable use of juries: if n"


-347962
2
0
-347962
-347962
0
-347962


"The vigor of government is essential to the security of liberty; that, in the contemplation of a sound and well-informed judgment, their interests can never be separated; and that a dangerous ambition more often lurks behind the specious mask of zeal for the rights of the people than under the forbidding appearance of zeal for the firmness and efficiency of government. History will teach us that the former has been found a much more certain road to the introduction of despotism than the latter, "


-347963
2
0
-347963
-347963
0
-347963


"Since private and publick Vices, are in Reality, though not always apparently, so nearly connected, of how much Importance, how necessary is it, that the utmost Pains be taken by the Publick, to have the Principles of Virtue early inculcated on the Minds even of children, and the moral Sense kept alive, and that the wise institutions of our Ancestors for these great Purposes be encouraged by the Government. For no people will tamely surrender their Liberties, nor can any be easily subdued, when "


-347964
2
0
-347964
-347964
0
-347964


"Our streets are filled with armed men; our harbor is crowded with ships of war; but these cannot intimidate us; our liberty must be preserved it is far dearer than life. No longer could we reflect, with generous pride, on the heroic actions of our American forefathers . . . . if we, but for a moment entertain the thought of giving up our liberty. Our country is in danger, but not to be despaired of. Our enemies are numerous and powerful; but we have many friends determining to be free, and heave"


-347965
2
0
-347965
-347965
0
-347965

in 1774

"History affords us many instances of the ruin of states, by the prosecution of measures ill suited to the temper and genius of their people. The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy . . . . These measures never fail to create great and violent jealousies and "


-347966
2
0
-347966
-347966
0
-347966


"For example. If the system be established on basis of Income, and his just proportion on that scale has been already drawn from every one, to step into the field of Consumption, and tax special articles in that, as broadcloth or homespun, wine or whiskey, a coach or a wagon, is doubly taxing the same article. For that portion of Income with which these articles are purchased, having already paid its tax as Income, to pay another tax on the thing it purchased, is paying twice for the same thing; "


-347967
2
0
-347967
-347967
0
-347967


"For example. If the system be established on basis of Income, and his just proportion on that scale has been already drawn from every one, to step into the field of Consumption, and tax special articles in that, as broadcloth or homespun, wine or whiskey, a coach or a wagon, is doubly taxing the same article. For that portion of Income with which these articles are purchased, having already paid its tax as Income, to pay another tax on the thing it purchased, is paying twice for the same thing; "


-347968
2
0
-347968
-347968
0
-347968


"To give to every citizen the information he needs for the transaction of his own business; To enable him to calculate for himself, and to express and preserve his ideas, his contracts and accounts, in writing; To improve, by reading, his morals and faculties; To understand his duties to his neighbors and country, and to discharge with competence the functions confided to him by either; To know his rights; to exercise with order and justice those he retains; to choose with discretion the fiduciar"


-347969
2
0
-347969
-347969
0
-347969

in 1788

"Every small district should be furnished with a school, at least four months in a year, when boys are not otherwise employed. This school should be kept by the most reputable and well informed man in the district. Here children should be taught the usual branches of learning; submission to superiors and to laws; the moral or social duties; the history and transactions of their own country; the principles of liberty and government. Here the rough manners of the wilderness should be softened, and "


-347970
2
0
-347970
-347970
0
-347970


"The supposition of a want of proper knowledge [in the Federal government of ?local circumstances], seems to be entirely destitute of foundation. If any question is depending in a State legislature respecting one of the counties which demand a knowledge of local details, how is it acquired? No doubt from the information of the members of the county. Cannot the like knowledge be obtained in the national legislature from the representatives of each state. And is it not to be presumed that the men w"


-347971
2
0
-347971
-347971
0
-347971

in 1903

"Considering the question as one of principle, it is evident that much depends on one?s political theory. If we believe that government has no jurisdiction over men unless they have consented to it, and that every man is entitled to equal civil and political rights, regardless of his fitness for them, then it follows that to deprive any man of the suffrage for any cause, or any people of self-government for any cause, is a departure from democratic principles . . . . If on the other hand, it is b"


-347972
2
0
-347972
-347972
0
-347972

in 1909

"In the complete democracy a man must in some way be made to serve the nation in the very act of contributing to his own individual fulfillment. Not until his personal action is dictated by disinterested motives can there be any such harmony between private and public interests. To ask an individual citizen continually to sacrfice his recognize private interest to the welfare of his countrymen is to make an impossible demand, and yet just such a continual sacrifice is apparently required of an in"


-347973
2
0
-347973
-347973
0
-347973

in 1821

"[I]t is not by the consolidation, or concentration of powers, but by their distribution, that good government is effected. Were not this great country already divided into states, that division must be made, that each might do for itself what concerns itself directly, and what it can so much better do than a distant authority. Every state again is divided into counties, each to take care of what lies within its local bounds; each county again into townships or wards, to manage minuter details; a"


-347974
2
0
-347974
-347974
0
-347974


"As the cool and deliberate sense of the community ought in all governments, and actually will in all free governments ultimately prevail over the views of its rulers; so there are particular moments in public affairs, when the people stimulated by some irregular passion, or some illicit advantage, or misled by the artful misrepresentations of interested men, may call for measures which they themselves will afterwards be the most ready to lament and condemn. In these critical moments, how salutar"


-347975
2
0
-347975
-347975
0
-347975


"As the cool and deliberate sense of the community ought in all governments, and actually will in all free governments ultimately prevail over the views of its rulers; so there are particular moments in public affairs, when the people stimulated by some irregular passion or some illicit advantage, or misled by the artful misrepresentations of interested men, may call for measures which they themselves will afterwards be the most ready to lament and condemn. In these crucial moments, how salutary "


-347976
2
0
-347976
-347976
0
-347976


"When a nation has actually come to a resolution to throw off a yoke, under which it may have groaned, and to assert its liberties, it is justifiable and meritorious in another, to afford assistance to the one which has been oppressed, and is in the act of liberating itself; but it is not warrantable for any nation beforehand, to hold out a general invitation to insurrection and revolution, by promising to assist every people who may wish to recover their liberty, and to defend those citizens of "


-347977
2
0
-347977
-347977
0
-347977


"This mode of reasoning appears some times to turn upon the supposition of usurpation in the national government . . . . The moment we launch into conjectures about the usurpations of the federal government, we get into an unfathomable abyss, and fairly put ourselves out of the reach of all reasoning. Imagination may range at pleasure until it gets bewildered amidst the labyrinths of an enchanted castle . . . it is easy to imagine an endless train of possible dangers; and by indulging an excess o"


-347978
2
0
-347978
-347978
0
-347978


"The science of politics, however, like most other sciences, has received great improvement. The efficacy of various principles is now well understood, which were either not known at all, or imperfectly known to the ancients. The regular distribution of power into distinct departments; the introduction of legislative balances and checks; the institution of courts composed of judges, holding their offices during good behaviour; the representation of the people in the legislature, by deputies of th"


-347979
2
0
-347979
-347979
0
-347979


"The contempt we have been taught to entertain for the blacks, makes us fancy many things that are founded neither in reason nor experience; and an unwillingness to part with property of so valuable a kind will furnish a thousand arguments to show the impracticability or pernicious tendency of a scheme which requires such a sacrifice. But it should be considered, that if we do not make use of them in this way, the enemy probably will; and that the best way to counteract the temptations they will "


-347980
2
0
-347980
-347980
0
-347980


"I now make it my earnest prayer, that God would have you, and the State over which you preside, in his holy protection, that he would incline the hearts of the Citizens to cultivate a spirit of subordination and obedience to Government, to entertain a brotherly affection and love for one another, for their fellow Citizens of the United States at large, and particularly for their brethren who have served in the Field, and finally, that he would most graciously be pleased to dispose us all, to do "


-347981
2
0
-347981
-347981
0
-347981


"The true question to be decided then is whether the smallness of the number [of representatives], as a temporary regulation, be dangerous to the public liberty . . . . I must own that I could not give a negative answer to this question, without first obliterating every impression which I have received with regard to the present genius of the people of America, which actuates the state legislatures, and the principles which are incorporated with the political character of every class of citizens."


-347982
2
0
-347982
-347982
0
-347982


"[T]o exclude foreign intrigues and foreign partialities, so degrading to all countries and so baneful to free ones; to foster a spirit of independence too just to invade the rights of others, too proud to surrender our own, too liberal to indulge unworthy prejudices ourselves and too elevated not to look down upon them in others; to hold the union of the States on the basis of their peace and happiness; to support the Constitution, which is the cement of the Union, as well in its limitations as "


-347983
2
0
-347983
-347983
0
-347983


"It is certainly true, that the State Legislatures, by forbearing the appointment of Senators, may destroy the National Government. But it will not follow, that because they have the power to do this in one instance, they ought to have it in every other . . . . So far as that construction may expose the Union to the possibility of injury from the State Legislatures, it is an evil; but it is an evil, which could not have been avoided without excluding the States, in their political capacities, who"


-347984
2
0
-347984
-347984
0
-347984


"But should the people of America once become capable of that deep simulation towards one another, and towards foreign nations, which assumes the language of justice and moderation while it is practicing iniquity and extravagance and displays in the most captivating manner the charming pictures of candor, frankness, and sincerity, while it is rioting in rapine and insolence, this country will be the most miserable habitation in the world; because we have no government armed with power capable of "


-347985
2
0
-347985
-347985
0
-347985


"This letter will, to you, be as one from the dead. The writer will be in the grave before you can weigh its counsels. Your affectionate and excellent father has requested that I would address to you something which might possibly have a favorable influence on the course of life you have to run; and I too, as a namesake, feel an interest in that course. Few words will be necessary, with good dispositions on your part. Adore God. Reverence and cherish your parents. Love your neighbor as yourself, "


-347986
2
0
-347986
-347986
0
-347986


"[N]or did I believe until lately, that it was within the bonds of probability; hardly within those of possibility, that, while I was using my utmost exertions to establish a national character of our own, independent, as far as our obligations, and justice would permit, of every nation of the earth; and wished, by steering a steady course, to preserve this Country from the horrors of a desolating war, that I should be accused of being the enemy of one Nation, and subject to the influence of anot"


-347987
2
0
-347987
-347987
0
-347987


"Wherever the standard of freedom and independence has been or shall be unfurled, there will her heart, her benedictions and her prayers be. But she goes not abroad, in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own. She will recommend the general cause by the countenance of her voice, and the benignant sympathy of her example. She well knows that by once enlisting under other banners than her own, w"


-347988
2
0
-347988
-347988
0
-347988


"At the establishment of our constitutions, the judiciary bodies were supposed to be the most helpless and harmless members of the government. Experience, however, soon showed in what way they were to become the most dangerous; that the insufficiency of the means provided for their removal gave them a freehold and irresponsibility in office; that their decisions, seeming to concern individual suitors only, pass silent and unheeded by the public at large; that these decisions, nevertheless, become"


-347989
2
0
-347989
-347989
0
-347989


"If a well-regulated militia be the most natural defense of a free country, it ought certainly to be under the regulation and at the disposal of that body which is constituted the guardian of the national security. If standing armies are dangerous to liberty, an efficacious power over the militia in the same body ought, as far as possible, to take away the inducement and the pretext to such unfriendly institutions. If the federal government can command the aid of the militia in those emergencies "


-347990
2
0
-347990
-347990
0
-347990


"This was the object of the Declaration of Independence. Not to find out new principles, or new arguments, never before thought of, not merely to say things which had never been said before; but to place before mankind the common sense of the subject, in terms so plain and firm as to command their assent, and to justify ourselves in the independent stand we are compelled to take. Neither aiming at originality of principle or sentiment, nor yet copied from any particular and previous writing, it w"


-347991
2
0
-347991
-347991
0
-347991


"The safety of a republic depends essentially on the energy of a common national sentiment; on a uniformity of principles and habits; on the exemption of the citizens from foreign bias and prejudice; and on that love of country which will almost invariably be found to be closely connected with birth, education, and family. The opinion advanced in the Notes on Virginia is undoubtedly correct, that foreigners will generally be apt to bring with them attachments to the persons they have left behind;"


-347992
2
0
-347992
-347992
0
-347992


"They are not to do anything they please to provide for the general welfare, but only to lay taxes for that purpose. To consider the latter phrase not as describing the purpose of the first, but as giving a distinct and independent power to do any act they please which may be good for the Union, would render all the preceding and subsequent enumerations of power completely useless. It would reduce the whole instrument to a single phrase, that of instituting a Congress with power to do whatever wo"


-347993
2
0
-347993
-347993
0
-347993

in 1918

"As an understanding of the group process abolishes ?individual rights,? so it gives us a true definition of liberty. We have seen that the free man is he who actualizes the will of the whole. I have no liberty except as an essential member of a group . . . . But liberty is not measured by the number of restraints we do not have, but by the number of spontaneous activities we do have . . . . We see that to obey the group which we have helped to make and of which we are an integral part is to be f"


-347994
2
0
-347994
-347994
0
-347994

on 4/1789

"The blessed Religion revealed in the word of God will remain an eternal and awful monument to prove that the best Institution may be abused by human depravity; and that they may even, in some instances be made subservient to the vilest purposes. Should, hereafter, those incited by the lust of power and prompted by the Supineness or venality of their Constituents, overleap the known barriers of this Constitution and violate the unalienable rights of humanity: it will only serve to shew, that no c"


-347995
2
0
-347995
-347995
0
-347995


"A number of years ago, I heard a young father, a very prominent young man in the entertainment world, addressing a tremendous gathering in California. It was during the time of the cold war, and communism and our own way of life were very much on peoples minds. And he was speaking to that subject. And suddenly, though, I heard him saying, ``I love my little girls more than anything -- -- And I said to myself, ``Oh, no, dont. You cant -- dont say that. But I had underestimated him. He went on: `"


-347996
2
0
-347996
-347996
0
-347996


"It is emphatically the province and duty of the Judicial Department to say what the law is. Those who apply the rule to particular cases must, of necessity, expound and interpret that rule. If two laws conflict with each other, the Courts must decide on the operation of each. So, if a law be in opposition to the Constitution, if both the law and the Constitution apply to a particular case, so that the Court must either decide that case conformably to the law, disregarding the Constitution, or co"


-347997
2
0
-347997
-347997
0
-347997


"[T]he citizens of the United States are responsible for the greatest trust ever confided to a political society. If justice, good faith, honor, gratitude and all the other qualities which ennoble the character of a nation and fulfill the ends of government be the fruits of our establishments, the cause of liberty will acquire a dignity and lustre, which it has never yet enjoyed, and an example will be set, which cannot but have the most favourable influence on the rights on Mankind. If on the ot"


-347998
2
0
-347998
-347998
0
-347998

on 9/1804

"[N]othing in the Constitution has given [the judiciary] a right to decide for the Executive, more than to the executive to decide for them. Both magistracies are equally independent in the sphere of action assigned to them. The judges, believing the law constitutional, had a right to pass a sentence of fine and imprisonment; because that power was placed in their hands by the Constitution. But the Executive, believing the law to be unconstitutional, was bound to remit the execution of it; becaus"


-347999
2
0
-347999
-347999
0
-347999


"I entirely concur in the propriety of resorting to the sense in which the Constitution was accepted and ratified by the nation. In that sense alone it is the legitimate Constitution. And if that is not the guide in expounding it, there may be no security for a consistent and stable, more than for a faithful exercise of its powers. If the meaning of the text be sought in the changeable meaning of the words composing it, it is evident that the shape and attributes of the Government must partake of"


-348000
2
0
-348000
-348000
0
-348000


"In the midst of these pleasing ideas we should be unfaithful to ourselves if we should ever lose sight of the danger to our liberties if anything partial or extraneous should infect the purity of our free, fair, virtuous, and independent elections. If an election is to be determined by a majority of a single vote, and that can be procured by a party through artifice or corruption, the Government may be the choice of a party for its own ends, not of the nation for the national good. If that solit"


-348001
2
0
-348001
-348001
0
-348001


"The Book of St. John tells us that ``For God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten son that whosoever believeth in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. We have Gods promise that what we give will be given back many times over. And we also have His promise that we could take to heart with regard to our country -- ``That if My people who are called by My name humble themselves and pray and seek My face and turn from their wicked ways, then will I hear from heaven and will f"


-348002
2
0
-348002
-348002
0
-348002


"During the contest of opinion through which we have passed the animation of discussions and of exertions has sometimes worn an aspect which might impose on strangers unused to think freely and to speak and to write what they think; but this being now decided by the voice of the nation, announced according to the rules of the Constitution, all will, of course, arrange themselves under the will of the law, and unite in common efforts for the common good . . . . Let us, then, fellow-citizens, unite"


-348003
2
0
-348003
-348003
0
-348003


"The representative assemblies ?will consist almost entirely of proprietors of land, of merchants and members of the learned professions, who will truly represent all those different interests and views . . . it is admitted there are exceptions to this rule, but not in sufficient number to influence the general complexion or character of the government. There are strong minds in every walk of life that will rise superior to the disadvantages of situation, and will command the tribute due to their"


-348004
2
0
-348004
-348004
0
-348004


"But the Day is past. The Second Day of July 1776, will be the most memorable Epocha, in the History of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated, by succeeding Generations, as the great anniversary Festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the Day of Deliverance by solemn Acts of Devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with Pomp and Parade, with Shews, Games, Sports, Guns, Bells, Bonfires and Illuminations from one End of this Continent to the other from this Time forwa"


-348005
2
0
-348005
-348005
0
-348005

on 9/1782

"The almost general mediocrity of fortune that prevails in America obliging its people to follow some business for subsistence, those vices, that arise usually from idleness, are in a great measure prevented. Industry and constant employment are great preservatives of the morals and virtue of a nation. Hence bad examples to youth are more rare in America, which must be a comfortable consideration to parents. To this may be truly added, that serious religion, under its various denominations, is no"


-348006
2
0
-348006
-348006
0
-348006


"Of all the dispositions and habits which least to political prosperity, Religion and morality are indespensible supports. In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism who should labor to subvert these great Pillars of human happiness - these firmest props of the duties of men and citizens. The mere Politician, equally with the pious man ought to respect and to cherish them. A volume could not trace all their connections with private and public felicity. Let it simply be asked where is "


-348007
2
0
-348007
-348007
0
-348007


"This Republic had its beginning, and grew to its present strength, under the protection of certain inalienable political rights?among them the right of free speech, free press, free worship, trial by jury, freedom from unreasonable searches and seizures. They were our rights to life and liberty. As our Nation has grown in size and stature, however?as our industrial economy expanded?these political rights proved inadequate to assure us equality in the pursuit of happiness. We have come to a clear"


-348008
2
0
-348008
-348008
0
-348008

in 1782

"And can the liberties of a nation be thought secure when we have removed their only firm basis, a conviction in the minds of the people that these liberties are of the gift of God? That they are not to be violated but with his wrath? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just: that his justice cannot sleep for ever: that considering numbers, nature, and natural means only, a revolution of the wheel of fortune, an exchange of situation, is among possible events: that it may b"


-348009
2
0
-348009
-348009
0
-348009


"As every appeal to the people would carry an implication of some defect in the government, frequent appeals would in great measure deprive the government of that veneration, which time bestows on everything, and without which perhaps the wisest and freest governments would not possess the requisite stability. If it be true that all governments rest on opinion, it is no less true that the strength of opinion in each individual, and its practical influence on his conduct, depend much on the number"


-348010
2
0
-348010
-348010
0
-348010


"[A]s to the general principles of liberty and the rights of man in nature and in society, the doctrines of Locke, in his ?Essay concerning the true original extent and end of civil government?, and of Sidney in his ?Discourses on government?, may be considered as those generally approved by our fellow-citizens of this, and the US. And that on the distinctive principles of the government of our state, and of that of the United States, the best guides are to be found in 1. the Declaration of Indep"


-348011
2
0
-348011
-348011
0
-348011


"And on the distinctive principles of the Government of our own State, and of that of the United States, the best guides are to be found in ?1. The Declaration of Independence as the fundamental act of Union of these States. 2. The book known by the title of the ?Federalist,? being an authority to which appeal is habitually made by all, and rarely declined or denied by any, as evidence of the general opinion of those who framed and those who accepted the Cosntitution of the United States on quest"


-348012
2
0
-348012
-348012
0
-348012


"About the Declaration there is a finality that is exceedingly restfull. It is often asserted that the world has made a great deal of progress since 1776, that we have had new thoughts and new experiences which have given us a great advance over the people of that day, and that we may therefore very well discard their conclusions for something more modern. But that reasoning can not be applied to this great charter. If all men are created equal, that is final. If they are endowed with inalienable"


-348013
2
0
-348013
-348013
0
-348013


"The foundation of our Empire was not laid in the gloomy age of Ignorance and Superstition, but at an Epocha when the rights of mankind were better understood and more clearly defined, than at any former period, the researches of the human mind, after social happiness, have been carried to a great extent, the Treasures of knowledge, acquired by the labours of Philosophers, Sages and Legislatures, through a long succession of years, are laid open for our use, and their collected wisdom may be happ"


-348014
2
0
-348014
-348014
0
-348014


"There is nothing which can better deserve your patronage, than the promotion of science and literature. Knowledge is, in every country, the surest basis of public happiness. In one in which the measures of government receive their impression so immediately from the sense of the community as in ours it is proportionably essential. To the security of a free constitution it contributes in various ways: By convincing those who are intrusted with the public administration, that every valuable end of "


-348015
2
0
-348015
-348015
0
-348015


"We have accepted, so to speak, a second Bill of Rights under which a new basis of security and prosperity can be established for all regardless of station, race, or creed. Among these are: The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or shops or farms or mines of the Nation; The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing and recreation;? The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return which will give him and his family a decent living; The rig"


-348016
2
0
-348016
-348016
0
-348016


"The Citizens of America, placed in the most enviable condition, as the sole Lords and Proprietors of a vast Tract of Continent, comprehending all the various soils and climates of the World, and abounding with all the necessaries and conveniencies of life, are now by the late satisfactory pacification, acknowledged to be possessed of absolute freedom and Independency; They are, from this period, to be considered as the Actors on a most conspicuous Theatre, which seems to be peculiarly designated"


-348017
2
0
-348017
-348017
0
-348017


"It has been urged and echoed, that the power ?to lay and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excises, to pay the debts and provide for the common defence and general welfare of the United States,? amounts to an unlimited commission to exercise every power which may be alleged to be necessary for the common defense or general welfare. No stronger proof could be given of the distress under which these writers labor for objections, than their stooping to such a misconstruction . . . what colour can "


-348018
2
0
-348018
-348018
0
-348018


"In all legislative assemblies, the greater the number composing them may be, the fewer will be the men who will in fact direct their proceedings. In the first place, the more numerous any assembly may be, of whatever characters composed, the greater is known to be the ascendancy of passion over reason. In the next place, the larger the number, the greater will be the proportion of members of limited information and of weak capacities. Now it is precisely on characters of this description that th"


-348019
2
0
-348019
-348019
0
-348019


"To grant that there is a supreme intelligence who rules the world and has established laws to regulate the actions of his creatures; and still to assert that man, in a state of nature, may be considered as perfectly free from all restraints of law and government, appears to a common understanding altogether irreconcilable. Good and wise men, in all ages, have embraced a very dissimilar theory. They have supposed that the deity, from the relations we stand in to himself and to each other, has con"


-348020
2
0
-348020
-348020
0
-348020


"The General Government will at all times stand ready to check the usurpations of the state governments; and these will have the same disposition towards the General Government. The people, by throwing themselves into either scale, will infallibly make it preponderate. If their rights are invaded by either, they can make use of the other, as the instrument of redress . . . the state governments will in all possible contingencies afford complete security against invasions of the public liberty by "


-348021
2
0
-348021
-348021
0
-348021


"It is our duty to endeavor always to promote the general good; to do to all as we would be willing to be done by were we in their circumstances; to do justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly before God. These are some of the laws of nature which every man in the world is bound to observe, and which whoever violates exposes himself to the resentment of mankind, the lashes of his own conscience, and the judgment of Heaven. This plainly shows that the highest state of liberty subjects us to the l"


-348022
2
0
-348022
-348022
0
-348022

on 6/1775

"I think he [Jefferson] had one more vote than any other, and that placed him at the head of the committee. I had the next highest number, and that placed me second. The committee met, discussed the subject, [of the Declaration of Independence] and then appointed Mr. Jefferson and me to make the draught, I suppose because we were the two first on the list. The subcommittee met. Jefferson proposed to me to make the draught. Adams: I will not. Jefferson: You should do it. Adams: Oh! no. Jefferson W"


-348023
2
0
-348023
-348023
0
-348023

in 1778

"All men are born equally free. The rights they possess at their births are equal, and of the same kind. Some of those rights are alienable, and may be parted with for an equivalent. Others are unalienable and inherent, and of that importance, that no equivalent can be received in exchange. Sometimes we shall mention the surrendering of a power to controul our natural rights, which perhaps is speaking with more precision, than when we use the expression of parting with natural rights - but the sa"


-348024
2
0
-348024
-348024
0
-348024

in 1835

"The kind of oppression with which democratic peoples are threatened will resemble nothing that has preceded it in the world . . . . The thing is new, therefore I must try to define it, since I cannot name it. I want to imagine with what new features despotism could be produce in the world: I see an innumerable crowd of like and equal men who revolve on themselves without repose, procuring the small and vulgar pleasures with which they fill their souls . . . . Above [the people] an immense tutela"


-348025
2
0
-348025
-348025
0
-348025

in 1913

"Government is not a machine, but a living thing. It falls, not under the theory of the universe, but under the theory of organic life. It is accountable to Darwin, not to Newton. It is modified by its environment, necessitated by its tasks, shaped to its functions by the sheer pressure of life. No living thing can have its organs offset against each other, as checks, and live. On the contrary, its life is dependent upon their quick cooperation, their ready response to the commands of instinct or"


-348026
2
0
-348026
-348026
0
-348026


"I do not want to see any of the people cringing supplicants for the favor of the Government, when they should all be independent masters of their own destiny."


-348027
2
0
-348027
-348027
0
-348027


"No matter what anyone may say about making the rich and the corporations pay the taxes, in the end they come out of the people who toil. It is your fellow workers who are ordered to work for the Government, every time an appropriation bill is passed. The people pay the expense of government, often many times over, in the increased cost of living. I want taxes to be less, that the people may have more."


-348028
2
0
-348028
-348028
0
-348028


"[I]t is a common observation here that our cause is the cause of all mankind, and that we are fighting for their liberty in defending our own."


-348029
2
0
-348029
-348029
0
-348029


"In disquisitions of every kind there are certain primary truths, or first principles, upon which all subsequent reasoning must depend."


-348030
2
0
-348030
-348030
0
-348030


"Why has government been instituted at all? Because the passions of men will not conform to the dictates of reason and justice without constraint."


-348031
2
0
-348031
-348031
0
-348031


"There is nothing absurd or impracticable in the idea of a league or alliance between independent nations for certain defined purposes precisely stated in a treaty regulating all the details of time, place, circumstance, and quantity; leaving nothing to future discretion; and depending for its execution on the good faith of the parties."


-348032
2
0
-348032
-348032
0
-348032


"Government implies the power of making laws. It is essential to the idea of a law, that it be attended with a sanction; or, in other words, a penalty or punishment for disobedience."


-348033
2
0
-348033
-348033
0
-348033


"A government ought to contain in itself every power requisite to the full accomplishment of the objects commmitted to its care, and to the complete execution of the trusts for which it is responsible, free from every other control but a regard to the public good and to the sense of the people."


-348034
2
0
-348034
-348034
0
-348034


"The institution of delegated power implies that there is a portion of virtue and honor among mankind, which may be a reasonable foundation of confidence. And experience justifies the theory: It has been found to exist in the most corrupt periods of the most corrupt governments."


-348035
2
0
-348035
-348035
0
-348035


"It is a singular capriciousness of the human mind, that after all the admonitions we have had from experience on this head, there should still be found men, who object to the new constitution for deviating from a principle which has been found the bane of the old."


-348036
2
0
-348036
-348036
0
-348036


"The experience of treaties being broken with impunity provide an ?afflicting lesson to mankind how little dependence is to be placed on treaties which have no other sanction than the obligations of good faith; and which oppose general considerations of peace and justice to the impulse of any immediate interest and passion."


-348037
2
0
-348037
-348037
0
-348037


"The constitution of human nature? teaches us not to expect ?that the persons, entrusted with the administration of the affairs of the particular members of a confederacy, will at all times be ready, with perfect good humor, and an unbiased regard to the public weal, to execute the resolutions of decrees of the general authority.? ?This tendency is not difficult to be accounted for,? Publius argues, ?It has its origin in the love of power."


-348038
2
0
-348038
-348038
0
-348038


"The obscurity is more often in the passions and prejudices of the reasoner than in the subject."


-348039
2
0
-348039
-348039
0
-348039


"Government implies the power of making laws. It is essential to the idea of a law, that it be attended with a sanction; or, in other words, a penalty or punishment for disobedience."


-348040
2
0
-348040
-348040
0
-348040


"But might not his [the president?s] nomination be overruled? I grant it might, yet this could only be to make place for another nomination by himself. The person ultimately appointed must be object of his preference, though perhaps not in the first degree. It is also not very probable that his nomination would often be overruled."


-348041
2
0
-348041
-348041
0
-348041


"As the duties of superintending the national defense and of securing the public peace against foreign or domestic violence involve a provision for casualties and dangers to which no possible limits can be assigned, the power of making that provision ought to know no other bounds than the exigencies of the nation and the resources of the community."


-348042
2
0
-348042
-348042
0
-348042


"[W]e must extend the authority of the Union to the persons of the citizens ? the only proper objects of government."


-348043
2
0
-348043
-348043
0
-348043


"There is in the nature of sovereign power an impatience of controul, that disposes those who are invested with the exercise of it, to look with an evil eye upon all external attempts to restrain or direct its operations."


-348044
2
0
-348044
-348044
0
-348044


"Power controuled or abridged is almost always the rival and enemy of that power by which it is controuled or abridged."


-348045
2
0
-348045
-348045
0
-348045


"It is by far the safer course to lay [considerations of the future] altogether aside; and to confine our attention wholly to the nature and extent of the powers as they are delineated in the constitution. Everything beyond this, must be left to the prudence and firmness of the people; who, as they will hold the scales in their own hands, it is to be hoped, will always take care to preserve the constitutional equilibrium between the General and State governments."


-348046
2
0
-348046
-348046
0
-348046


"The supposition of universal venality in human nature is little less an error in political reasoning than the supposition of universal rectitude. The institution of delegated power implies that there is a portion of virtue and honor among mankind, which may be a reasonable foundation of confidence. And experience justifies the theory: It has been found to exist in the most corrupt periods of the most corrupt governments."


-348047
2
0
-348047
-348047
0
-348047


"Believing with you that religion is a matter which lies solely between man and his God, that he owes account to none other for his faith or his worship, that the legislative powers of government reach actions only, and not opinions, I contemplate with sovereign reverence that act of the whole American people which declared that their legislature should make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof, thus building a wall of separation between church "


-348048
2
0
-348048
-348048
0
-348048


"When right, I shall often be thought wrong by those whose positions will not command a view of the whole ground."


-348049
2
0
-348049
-348049
0
-348049


"[I]t seems that the Cannibals of Europe are going to eat one another again. A war between Russia and Turkey is like the battle of the kite and snake; whichever destroys the other, leaves a destroyer the less for the world."


-348050
2
0
-348050
-348050
0
-348050


"I hope we shall prove how much happier for man the Quaker policy is, and that the life of the feeder is better than that of the fighter; and it is some consolation that the desolation by these maniacs of one part of the earth is the means of improving it in other parts. Let the latter be our office, and let us milk the cow, while the Russian holds her by the horns, and the Turk by the tail."


-348051
2
0
-348051
-348051
0
-348051


"Experience having long taught me the reasonableness of mutual sacrifices of opinion among those who are to act together for any common object, and the expediency of doing what good we can; when we cannot do all we would wish."


-348052
2
0
-348052
-348052
0
-348052


"A truth now and then projecting into the ocean of newspaper lies serves like headlands to correct our course. Indeed, my scepticism as to everything I see in a newspaper makes me indifferent whether I ever see one."


-348053
2
0
-348053
-348053
0
-348053


"The prohibition against cruel and unusual punishments, like other expansive language in the Constitution, must be interpreted according to its text, by considering history, tradition, and precedent, and with due regard for its purpose and function in the constitutional design. To implement this framework we have established the propriety and affirmed the necessity of referring to the evolving standards of decency that mark the progress of a maturing society."


-348054
2
0
-348054
-348054
0
-348054


"If there could ever be a time for mere catch arguments, that time is surely not now. In times like the present, men should utter nothing for which they would not be personally responsible through time and eternity."


-348055
2
0
-348055
-348055
0
-348055


"The legislative department is everywhere extending the sphere of its activity and drawing all power into its impetuous vortex."


-348056
2
0
-348056
-348056
0
-348056


"One hundred and seventy-three despots would surely be as oppressive as one."


-348057
2
0
-348057
-348057
0
-348057


"It will not be denied that power is of an encroaching nature and that it ought to be effectually restrained from passing the limits assigned to it. After discriminating, therefore, in theory, the several classes of power, as they may in their nature be legislative, executive, or judiciary, the next and most difficult task is to provide some practical security for each, against the invasion of the others."


-348058
2
0
-348058
-348058
0
-348058


"For the same reason that the members of the State legislatures will be unlikely to attach themselves sufficiently to national objects, the members of the federal legislature will be likely to attach themselves too much to local objects."


-348059
2
0
-348059
-348059
0
-348059


"Besides the advantage of being armed, which the Americans possess over the people of almost every other nation, the existence of subordinate governments, to which the people are attached and by which the militia officers are appointed, forms a barrier against the enterprises of ambition, more insurmountable than any which a simple government of any form can admit of."


-348060
2
0
-348060
-348060
0
-348060


"[I]n the next place, to show that unless these departments be so far connected and blended as to give to each a constitutional control over the others, the degree of separation which the maxim requires, as essential to a free government, can never in practice be duly maintained."


-348061
2
0
-348061
-348061
0
-348061


"The magnitude of this evil among us is so deeply felt, and so universally acknowledged, that no merit could be greater than that of devising a satisfactory remedy for it."


-348062
2
0
-348062
-348062
0
-348062


"Religious bondage shackles and debilitates the mind and unfits it for every noble enterprize, every expanded prospect."


-348063
2
0
-348063
-348063
0
-348063


"Such an institution may be sometimes necessary as a defense to the people against their own temporary errors and delusions."


-348064
2
0
-348064
-348064
0
-348064


"Popular liberty might then have escaped the indelible reproach of decreeing to the same citizens, the hemlock on one day, and statues on the next."


-348065
2
0
-348065
-348065
0
-348065


"The people can never willfully betray their own interests: But they may possibly be betrayed by the representatives of the people; and the danger will be evidently greater where the whole legislative trust is lodged in the hands of one body of men, than where the concurrence of separate and dissimilar bodies is required in every public act."


-348066
2
0
-348066
-348066
0
-348066


"The danger from legislative usurpations, which, by assembling all power in the same hands, must lead to the same tyranny as is threatened by executive usurpations."


-348067
2
0
-348067
-348067
0
-348067


"Inference is founded upon obvious reasons. Regard to reputation has a less active influence, when the infamy of a bad action is to be divided upon a number, than when it is to fall singly upon one. A spirit of faction . . . will often hurry the persons of whom they were composed into improprieties and excesses for which they would blush in a private capacity."


-348068
2
0
-348068
-348068
0
-348068


"It will not be denied that power is of encroaching nature and that it ought to be effectually restrained from passing the limits assigned to it."


-348069
2
0
-348069
-348069
0
-348069


"Experience assures us, that the efficacy of the provision has been greatly over-rated; and that some more adequate defense is indispensably necessary for the more feeble, against the more powerful members of the government."


-348070
2
0
-348070
-348070
0
-348070


"I have appealed to our own experience for the truth of what I advance on this subject [that the legislative power is the predominant power]. Were it necessary to verify this experience by particular proofs, they might be multiplied without end. I might find a witness in every citizen who has shared in, or been attentive to, the course of public administrations."


-348071
2
0
-348071
-348071
0
-348071


"These examples, though as unfit for the imitation, as they are repugnant to the genius of America, are notwithstanding . . . very instructive proofs of the necessity of some institution that will blend stability with liberty."


-348072
2
0
-348072
-348072
0
-348072


"In the next place, to show that unless these departments be so far connected and blended as to give to each a constitutional control over the others, the degree of separation which the maxim requires, as essential to a free government, can never in practice be duly maintained."


-348073
2
0
-348073
-348073
0
-348073


"Weve been blessed with the opportunity to stand for something - for liberty and freedom and fairness. And these are things worth fighting for, worth devoting our lives to."


-348074
2
0
-348074
-348074
0
-348074


"[T]he foundation of a great Empire is laid, and I please myself with a persuasion, that Providence will not leave its work imperfect."


-348075
2
0
-348075
-348075
0
-348075


"It is on great occasions only, and after time has been given for cool and deliberate reflection, that the real voice of the people can be known."


-348076
2
0
-348076
-348076
0
-348076


"My anxious recollections, my sympathetic feeling, and my best wishes are irresistibly excited whensoever, in any country, I see an oppressed nation unfurl the banners of freedom."


-348077
2
0
-348077
-348077
0
-348077


"I rejoice that liberty . . . now finds an asylum in the bosom of a regularly organized government; a government, which, being formed to secure happiness of the French people, corresponds with the ardent wishes of my heart, while it gratifies the pride of every citizen of the United States, by its resemblance to their own."


-348078
2
0
-348078
-348078
0
-348078


"What is meant by the liberty of the press is, that there should be no antecedent restraint upon it; but that every author is responsible when he attacks the security or welfare of the government, or the safety, character, and property of the individual."


-348079
2
0
-348079
-348079
0
-348079


"The foundation of national morality must be laid in private families . . . . How is it possible that Children can have any just Sense of the sacred Obligations of Morality or Religion if, from their earliest Infancy, they learn that their Mothers live in habitual Infidelity to their fathers, and their fathers in as constant Infidelity to their Mothers? "


-348080
2
0
-348080
-348080
0
-348080


"In vain are Schools, Academies, and Universities instituted, if loose Principles and licentious habits are impressed upon Children in their earliest years . . . . The Vices and Examples of the Parents cannot be concealed from the Children. How is it possible that Children can have any just Sense of the sacred Obligations of Morality or Religion if, from their earliest Infancy, they learn their Mothers live in habitual Infidelity to their fathers, and their fathers in as constant Infidelity to th"


-348081
2
0
-348081
-348081
0
-348081


"I Pray Heaven to Bestow The Best of Blessing on THIS HOUSE, and on ALL that shall hereafter Inhabit it. May none but Honest and Wise Men ever rule under This Roof!"


-348082
2
0
-348082
-348082
0
-348082


"The Convention probably foresaw what it has been a principal aim of these papers to inculcate that the danger which most threatens our political welfare is, that the state governments will finally sap the foundations of the Union."


-348083
2
0
-348083
-348083
0
-348083


"The propriety of a law, in a constitutional light, must always be determined by the nature of the powers upon which it is founded."


-348084
2
0
-348084
-348084
0
-348084


"A LAW, by the very meaning of the term, includes supremacy. It is a rule which those to whom it is prescribed are bound to observe. This results from every political association."


-348085
2
0
-348085
-348085
0
-348085


"It will teach as enemies the people who, refusing or renouncing liberty and equality, are desirous of preserving their prince and privileged casts, or of entering into an accommodation with them."


-348086
2
0
-348086
-348086
0
-348086


"[H]is was the singular destiny and merit, of leading the armies of his country successfully through an arduous war, for the establishment of its independence; of conducting its councils through the birth of a government, new in its forms and principles, until it had settled down into a quite and orderly train; and of scrupulously obeying the laws through the whole of his career, civil and military, of which the history of the world furnishes no other example."


-348087
2
0
-348087
-348087
0
-348087


"His person, you know, was fine, his stature exactly what one would wish, his deportment easy, erect and noble."


-348088
2
0
-348088
-348088
0
-348088


"Born in other countries, yet believing you could be happy in this, our laws acknowledge, as they should do, your right to join us in society, conforming, as I doubt not you will do, to our established rules. That these rules shall be as equal as prudential considerations will admit, will certainly be the aim of our legislatures, general and particular."


-348089
2
0
-348089
-348089
0
-348089


"Reading, reflection and time have convinced me that the interests of society require the observation of those moral precepts only in which all religions agree."


-348090
2
0
-348090
-348090
0
-348090


"Education is here placed among the articles of public care, not that it would be proposed to take its ordinary branches out of the hands of private enterprise, which manages so much better all the concerns to which it is equal, but a public institution can alone supply those sciences which, though rarely called for, are yet necessary to complete the circle, all the parts of which contribute to the improvement of the country, and some of them to its preservation."


-348091
2
0
-348091
-348091
0
-348091


"His integrity was most pure, his justice the most inflexible I have ever known, no motives of interest or consanguinity, of friendship or hatred, being able to bias his decision. He was indeed, in every sense of the words, a wise, a good, and a great man."


-348092
2
0
-348092
-348092
0
-348092


"Although in the circle of his friends, where he might be unreserved with safety, he took a free share in conversation his colloquial talents were not above mediocrity, possessing neither copiousness of ideas, nor fluency of words. In public, when called on for a sudden opinion, he was unready, short and embarrassed."


-348093
2
0
-348093
-348093
0
-348093


"On the whole, his character was, in its mass, perfect, in nothing bad, in few points indifferent; and it may truly be said, that never did nature and fortune combine more perfectly to make a man great, and to place him in the same constellation with whatever worthies have merited from man an everlasting remembrance."


-348094
2
0
-348094
-348094
0
-348094


"Perhaps the strongest feature in his character was prudence, never acting until every circumstance, every consideration, was maturely weighed; refraining if he saw a doubt, but, when once decided, going through with his purpose, whatever obstacles opposed."


-348095
2
0
-348095
-348095
0
-348095


"His mind was great and powerful, without being of the very first order; his penetration strong, though not so acute as that of Newton, Bacon, or Locke; and as far as he saw, no judgment was ever sounder."


-348096
2
0
-348096
-348096
0
-348096


"Newspapers . . . serve as chimnies to carry off noxious vapors and smoke."


-348097
2
0
-348097
-348097
0
-348097


"Very many and very meritorious were the worthy patriots who assisted in bringing back our government to its republican tack. To preserve it in that, will require unremitting vigilance."


-348098
2
0
-348098
-348098
0
-348098


"An honorable Peace is and always was my first wish! I can take no delight in the effusion of human Blood; but, if this War should continue, I wish to have the most active part in it."


-348099
2
0
-348099
-348099
0
-348099


"A universal peace, it is to be feared, is in the catalogue of events, which will never exist but in the imaginations of visionary philosophers, or in the breasts of benevolent enthusiasts."


-348100
2
0
-348100
-348100
0
-348100


"It is sufficiently obvious, that persons and property are the two great subjects on which Governments are to act; and that the rights of persons, and the rights of property, are the objects, for the protection of which Government was instituted. These rights cannot well be separated."


-348101
2
0
-348101
-348101
0
-348101


"It is due to justice; due to humanity; due to truth; to the sympathies of our nature; in fine, to our character as a people, both abroad and at home, that they should be considered, as much as possible, in the light of human beings, and not as mere property. As such, they are acted upon by our laws, and have an interest in our laws."


-348102
2
0
-348102
-348102
0
-348102


"But the mere circumstance of complexion cannot deprive them of the character of men."


-348103
2
0
-348103
-348103
0
-348103


"Is there a Legislative power in fact, not expressly prohibited by the Constitution, which might not, according to the doctrine of the Court, be exercised as a means of carrying into effect some specified Power?"


-348104
2
0
-348104
-348104
0
-348104


"To refer the power in question to the clause to provide for the common defense and general welfare would be contrary to the established and consistent rules of interpretation, as rendering the special and careful enumeration of powers which follow the clause nugatory and improper. Such a view of the Constitution would have the effect of giving to Congress a general power of legislation instead of the defined and limited one hitherto understood to belong to them, the terms common defense and gene"


-348105
2
0
-348105
-348105
0
-348105


"The essence of Government is power; and power, lodged as it must be in human hands, will ever be liable to abuse."


-348106
2
0
-348106
-348106
0
-348106


"As the people are the only legitimate fountain of power, and it is from them that the constitutional charter, under which the several branches of government hold their power, is derived, it seems strictly consonant to the republican theory to recur to the same original authority."


-348107
2
0
-348107
-348107
0
-348107


"Ive been told that some members of Congress disagree with my tax cut proposal. Well, you know its been said that taxation is the art of plucking feathers without killing the bird. Its time they realized the bird just doesnt have any feathers left."


-348108
2
0
-348108
-348108
0
-348108


"And you will, by the dignity of your Conduct, afford occasion for Posterity to say, when speaking of the glorious example you have exhibited to Mankind, had this day been wanting, the World had never seen the last stage of perfection to which human nature is capable of attaining."


-348109
2
0
-348109
-348109
0
-348109


"Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth."


-348110
3
0
-348110
-348110
0
-348110


"The bosom of America is open to receive not only the Opulent and respectable Stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges, if by decency and propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment."


-348111
2
0
-348111
-348111
0
-348111


"We have therefore to resolve to conquer or die: Our won Countrys Honor, all call upon us for vigorous and manly exertion, and if we now shamefully fail, we shall become infamous to the whole world. Let us therefore rely upon the goodness of the Cause, and the aid of the supreme Being, in whose hands Victory is, to animate and encourage us to great and noble Actions."


-348112
2
0
-348112
-348112
0
-348112


"The consciousness of having discharged that duty which we owe to our country is superior to all other considerations."


-348113
3
0
-348113
-348113
0
-348113


"The world must be made safe for democracy."


-348114
2
0
-348114
-348114
0
-348114


"The dons, the bashaws, the grandees, the patricians, the sachems, the nabobs, call them by what names you please, sigh and groan and fret, and sometimes stamp and foam and curse, but all in vain. The decree is gone forth, and it cannot be recalled, that a more equal liberty than has prevailed in other parts of the earth must be established in America. "


-348115
2
0
-348115
-348115
0
-348115


"It has ever been my hobby-horse to see rising in America an empire of liberty, and a prospect of two or three hundred millions of freemen, without one noble or one king among them. You say it is impossible. If I should agree with you in this, I would still say, let us try the experiment, and preserve our equality as long as we can. A better system of education for the common people might preserve them long from such artificial inequalities as are prejudicial to society, by confounding the natura"


-348116
2
0
-348116
-348116
0
-348116


"Yesterday, the greatest question was decided, which ever was debated in America, and a greater, perhaps, never was or will be decided among men . . . . You will see in a few days a Declaration setting forth the causes which have impelled us to this mighty revolution, and the reasons which will justify it in the sight of God and man."


-348117
2
0
-348117
-348117
0
-348117


"But as the plan of the convention aims only at a partial union or consolidation, the State governments would clearly retain all the rights of sovereignty which they before had, and which were not, by that act, EXCLUSIVELY delegated to the United States."


-348118
2
0
-348118
-348118
0
-348118


"If the federal government should overpass the just bounds of its authority and make a tyrannical use of its powers, the people, whose creature it is, must appeal to the standard they have formed, and take such measures to redress the injury done to the Constitution as the exigency may suggest and prudence justify."


-348119
2
0
-348119
-348119
0
-348119


"The propriety of a law, in a constitutional light, must always be deteremined by the nature of the powers upon which it is founded."


-348120
2
0
-348120
-348120
0
-348120


"The bordering states if any . . . will be most likely by direct violence, to excite war with other nations; and nothing can so effectually obviate that danger, as a national government, whose wisdom and prudence will not be diminished by the passions which actuate the parties immediately interested."


-348121
2
0
-348121
-348121
0
-348121


"It is not a new observation that the people of any country (if like the Americans intelligent and well informed) seldom adopt, and steadily persevere for many years in, an erroneous opinion respecting their interests."


-348122
2
0
-348122
-348122
0
-348122


"Once an efficient national government is established, the best men in the country will not only consent to serve, but also will generally be appointed to manage it . . . and [it will] never experience that want of proper persons, which is not uncommon in some of the states."


-348123
2
0
-348123
-348123
0
-348123


"Among the many objects to which a wise and free people find it necessary to direct their attention, that of providing for their safety seems to be first . . . . At present I mean only to consider it as it respects security for the preservation of peace and tranquility, as well as against dangers from foreign arms and influence, as from dangers of like kind arising from domestic causes"


-348124
2
0
-348124
-348124
0
-348124


"Is it the Fourth?"


-348125
2
0
-348125
-348125
0
-348125


"The experience of the United States is a happy disproof of the error so long rooted in the unenlightened minds of well meaning Christians, as well as in the corrupt hearts of persecuting Usurpers, that without a legal incorporation of religious and civil polity, neither could be supported. A mutual independence is found most friendly to practical Religion, to social harmony, and to political prosperity."


-348126
2
0
-348126
-348126
0
-348126


"Yes, deficits are a problem. Ive been saying so for more than a quarter of a century now. But the problem is not the size of the deficit, its the size of governments claim on our economy."


-348127
2
0
-348127
-348127
0
-348127


"Let us resolve tonight that young Americans will always . . . find there a city of hope in a country that is free . . . . And let us resolve they will say of our day and our generation, we did keep the faith with our God, that we did act worthy of ourselves, that we did protect and pass on lovingly that shining city on a hill."


-348128
2
0
-348128
-348128
0
-348128


"The [tenth] amendment states but a truism that all is retained which has not been surrendered."


-348129
2
0
-348129
-348129
0
-348129


"There is a rank due to the United States, among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; if we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known that we are at all times ready for war."


-348130
2
0
-348130
-348130
0
-348130


"No pecuniary consideration is more urgent, than the regular redemption and discharge of the public debt: on none can delay be more injurious, or an economy of time more valuable."


-348131
2
0
-348131
-348131
0
-348131


"It is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor."


-348132
2
0
-348132
-348132
0
-348132


"The establishment of our new Government seemed to be the last great experiment for promoting human happiness by reasonable compact in civil society. It was to be, in the first instance, in a considerable degree a government of accommodation as well as a government of Laws. Much was to be done by prudence, much by conciliation, much by firmness."


-348133
2
0
-348133
-348133
0
-348133


"[L]eave nothing to the uncertainty of procuring a warlike apparatus at the moment of public danger."


-348134
2
0
-348134
-348134
0
-348134


"Houses of Congress have . . . requested me to recommend to the people of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging, with grateful hearts, the many signal favors of Almighty God."


-348135
2
0
-348135
-348135
0
-348135


"Thomas Jefferson still lives. "


-348136
3
0
-348136
-348136
0
-348136


"Independence forever."


-348137
3
0
-348137
-348137
0
-348137


"Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclination, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence. "


-348138
2
0
-348138
-348138
0
-348138


"The inconsistency of the institution of domestic slavery with the principles of the Declaration of Independence was seen and lamented . . . no insincerity or hypocrisy can be fairly laid to their charge. Never from their lips was heard one syllable of attempt to justify the institution of slavery. They universally considered it as a reproach fastened upon them by the unnatural step-mother country and they saw that before the principles of the Declaration of Independence slavery, in common with e"


-348139
2
0
-348139
-348139
0
-348139


"[Americas] glory is not dominion, but liberty. Her march is the march of the mind. She has a spear and a shield: but the motto upon her shield is Freedom, Independence, Peace. This has been her declaration: this has been, as far as her necessary intercourse with the rest of mankind would permit, her practice."


-348140
2
0
-348140
-348140
0
-348140


"The public cannot be too curious concerning the characters of public men. "


-348141
2
0
-348141
-348141
0
-348141


"Nothing is more essential to the establishment of manners in a State than that all persons employed in places of power and trust must be men of unexceptionable characters. "


-348142
2
0
-348142
-348142
0
-348142


"I favor the policy of economy, not because I wish to save money, but because I wish to save people. The men and women of this country who toil are the ones who bear the cost of the Government. Every dollar that we carelessly waste means that their life will be so much the more meager. Every dollar that we save means that their life will be so much the more abundant. Economy is idealism in its most practical form."


-348143
3
0
-348143
-348143
0
-348143


"The collection of taxes which are not absolutely required, which do not beyond reasonable doubt contribute to public welfare, is only a species of legalized larceny. Under this Republic the rewards of industry belong to those who earn them."


-348144
3
0
-348144
-348144
0
-348144


"Our country represents nothing but peaceful intentions toward all the earth, but it ought not to fail to maintain such a military force as comports with the dignity and security of a great people."


-348145
3
0
-348145
-348145
0
-348145

in 1846

"The Constitution is a GLORIOUS LIBERTY DOCUMENT. Read its preamble, consider it purposes. Is slavery among them? Is it at the gateway? or is it in the temple? it is neither."


-348146
2
1
-348146
-348146
1
-348146


"Now, take the Constitution according to its plain reading, and I defy the presentation of a single pro-slavery clause in it. On the other hand it will be found to contain principles and purposes, entirely hostile to the existence of slavery."


-348147
2
0
-348147
-348147
0
-348147


"We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately."


-348148
4
0
-348148
-348148
0
-348148


"And as to the Cares, they are chiefly what attend the bringing up of Children; and I would ask any Man who has experienced it, if they are not the most delightful Cares in the World; and if from that Particular alone, he does not find the Bliss of a double State much greater, instead of being less than he expected."


-348149
2
0
-348149
-348149
0
-348149


"Finally, there seem to be but three Ways for a Nation to acquire Wealth. The first is by War as the Romans did in plundering their conquered Neighbours. This is Robbery. The second by Commerce which is generally Cheating. The third by Agriculture the only honest Way; wherein Man receives a real Increase of the Seed thrown into the Ground, in a kind of continual Miracle wrought by the Hand of God in his favour, as a Reward for his innocent Life, and virtuous Industry."


-348150
2
0
-348150
-348150
0
-348150


"To model our political system upon speculations of lasting tranquility, is to calculate on the weaker springs of the human character."


-348151
2
0
-348151
-348151
0
-348151


"To judge from the history of mankind, we shall be compelled to conclude that the fiery and destructive passions of war reign in the human breast with much more powerful sway than the mild and beneficent sentiments of peace; and that to model our political systems upon speculations of lasting tranquillity would be to calculate on the weaker springs of human character."


-348152
2
0
-348152
-348152
0
-348152


"Constitutions of civil government are not to be framed upon a calculation of existing exigencies, but upon a combination of these with the probable exigencies of ages, according to the natural and tried course of human affairs. Nothing, therefore, can be more fallacious than to infer the extent of any power, proper to be lodged in the national government, from an estimate of its immediate necessities."


-348153
2
0
-348153
-348153
0
-348153


"Let us recollect that peace or war will not always be left to our option; that however moderate or unambitious we may be, we cannot count upon the moderation, or hope to extinguish the ambition of others."


-348154
2
0
-348154
-348154
0
-348154


"There is perhaps, nothing more likely to disturb the tranquillity of nations, than their being bound to mutual contributions for any common object that does not yield an equal and coincident benefit. For it is an observation as true, as it is trite, that there is nothing men differ so readily about as the payment of money."


-348155
2
0
-348155
-348155
0
-348155


"When the sword is once drawn, the passions of men observe no bounds of moderation."


-348156
2
0
-348156
-348156
0
-348156


"It is vain to hope to guard against events too mighty for human foresight or precaution, and it would be idle to object to a government because it could not perform impossibilities."


-348157
2
0
-348157
-348157
0
-348157


"There! His Majesty can now read my name without glasses. And he can double the reward on my head!"


-348158
4
0
-348158
-348158
0
-348158


"We must be unanimous; there must be no pulling different ways; we must hang together."


-348159
4
0
-348159
-348159
0
-348159


"My hand trembles, but my heart does not."


-348160
4
0
-348160
-348160
0
-348160


"[A] rigid economy of the public contributions and absolute interdiction of all useless expenses will go far towards keeping the government honest and unoppressive."


-348161
2
0
-348161
-348161
0
-348161


"Still one thing more, fellow citizens?a wise and frugal government . . . shall restrain men from injuring one another, shall leave them otherwise free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned. This is the sum of good government, and this is necessary to close the circle of our felicities."


-348162
2
0
-348162
-348162
0
-348162


"[I]t is proper you should understand what I deem the essential principles of our Government . . . . Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever persuasion, religious or political . . . ."


-348163
2
0
-348163
-348163
0
-348163


"We are firmly convinced, and we act on that conviction, that with nations as with individuals our interests soundly calculated will ever be found inseparable from our moral duties, and history bears witness to the fact that a just nation is trusted on its word when recourse is had to armaments and wars to bridle others."


-348164
2
0
-348164
-348164
0
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"?[I]f there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union, or to change it?s republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated, where reason is left free to combat it.?"


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"[A]lthough a republican government is slow to move, yet when once in motion, its momentum becomes irresistible."


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"All, too, will bear in mind this sacred principle, that though the will of the majority is in all cases to prevail, that will to be rightful must be reasonable; that the minority possess their equal rights, which equal law must protect, and to violate would be oppression."


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